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Installing Salt Chlorine Generator And Timer


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Greetings,

I'm a pool novice; moved into a house with an in ground pool last fall. The pool has been winterized and covered with a mesh cover. I intend to switch to salt water upon opening up for the spring along with a timer for the pumps. I have purchased a Hayward SwimPure chlorine generator and an intermatic mechanical timer but am having trouble figuring out how to do the wiring. Photos of my current setup are at this link: https://accounts.craigslist.org/post/shwpst...85281&db=lv

Also, I could use some advice on how to physically make the conversion from chlorine to salt.

If anyone knows of a tutorial on the subject or can give me some advice, I'd sure appreciate it.

Thanks,

djdixon1995

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We have a salt generator system that was pretty easy to install. It started making chlorine right away - we just had to dump a few hundred pounds of salt into the pool and keep the pump running for a couple days.

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....ok since you are using a swimpure which is also called a Goldline aquarite, this will be easy to walk you through...

Plumbing...

There is one concern for me...the location of the return line from your Polaris booster pump...we can work around this later though...

First, plumb the salt cell on the straight run towards the ground on the pool return line after the filter using the supplied unions...looks to me like you have 1.5" pipe...the unit uses 2" unions so, you will need adapters

Second, put the flow switch in after the cell (you need 12" of straight run for a flow switch, and installing the flow switch right after the cell will account for that distance)

You can measure out and glue the flow switch tee to the pipe without unions and then glue one of the cell unions to the tee... there is no need to unionize the tee for the fact that if a flow switch craps out you can just unscrew it from the tee...

To resolve the problem of the cell which generates chlorine right by the Polaris pump...(which is undesireable because you don't want to introduce chlorine before any equipment, and we don't want to bury your cell and flow switch in the ground after the Polaris pump)...you can either: A. Plumb in a tee for the Polaris before the cell or B.Put a simple check valve from Lowes or Home depot off the return tee by building off of it with a male adapter with a glue end to another glue ended male adpater, then a threaded check valve, and then thread the Polaris hose fitting into the end of the check valve....all this plumbing will be 1 inch

Electrical....

I am not liable for anyone on this website killing themselves from reading this...you all assume all risk when working with electricity, and if you are not confident with you skills, then I advise you to contact a electrician for service

that being said.....

looks like you use 240 volts for your pump, as long as your timeclock will run 240volts you're good to go...the salt generator you have can run either 240 or 115...

on your salt generator there are 4 terminals where eletrical lines hook up...there should be a jumper installed from the factory between the 2 middle terminals....that is the correct setup for 240 volts....your power wires will connect at the top-most and bottom-most terminals

make sure your breaker is large enough to handle the peak load of your pump, timeclock, and the generator combined

you can wire from your breaker panel to you timeclock, then run a flex whip down to your pump, and off the same terminals on the timeclock run a separate flex whip to your chlorine generator...make sure you properly bond the generator to everything else using 8 awg copper...

that pretty much sums it up...let me know if you need clarification on anything...i can draw things out if you'd like, scan them, and post the pictures

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A salt water chlorinator makes chlorine from salt. It usually takes a couple weeks to a month for the salt to start making chlorine so you will still need to use chlorine.

That's not true. It will start making chlorine as soon as the salt is mixed up, which shouldn't take more than a few days maximum, and usually it's far less.

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A salt water chlorinator makes chlorine from salt. It usually takes a couple weeks to a month for the salt to start making chlorine so you will still need to use chlorine.

That's not true. It will start making chlorine as soon as the salt is mixed up, which shouldn't take more than a few days maximum, and usually it's far less.

yea that guy is what we refer to on another forum I'm on as a google-search-cut-and-paster, its like thanks dude! Its like rocket science!! Damn, I couldn't figure out that a saltwater chlorinator makes salt from chlorine until you brought your IQ of 190 in here....hmmm...salt...water...chlorine???salt...water....chlorinator....saltwater chlorination??? Thanks for the saltwater tutorial!!!

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Thanks for the great advice from Paragon Pools. I was out of town for a few weeks but just got back and ran the plumbing based on your recommendations...piece of cake.

I'm about ready to tackle the wiring but have a few questions.

Should I connect the polaris pump, pool pump, and chlorine generaror all to the same terminals on the time clock?

Do I just run one set if wires from the breaker box to the time clock and then have all the components wired directly to the time clock?

Thanks,

djdixon1995

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I do a lot of SWG installations locally, and it's typically very quick and easy. If your plumbing is in good condition and easy to get to, it could be done in an hour. If it is difficult to get to, brittle, limited space, or leaky, it could take considerably more. I would say under $100 for labor if it's quick and easy. If there are complications, it will probably be charged by the hour (we charge $85/hr).

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Wouldn't you want to run your Polaris Pump on a different time clock? You only need to run em 3 hours a day...

I'd recommend hooking your pool pump and saltwater generator up on the same clock obviously...and as I stated before you can pair them by running wires from the breaker to the timeclock and then to the pump and generator....

you need to wire the generator voltage correctly as I described above

make sure the breaker for you'll use the pump and generator on can handle the amps they'll draw....the pump should say it on the motor label and the generator should have the data in the owners manual

let me know if you have any more questions....glad I could help ya out....

It usually takes me about an hour to an hour and a half if the plumbing is straightfoward...barring a complete pump area replumb to accomondate the cell and flow switch nobody should charge for more than 2 to 3 hours of labor

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Thanks again...makes sense to have the polaris pump seperate. I think I'll leave that one off the timer altogether. I think what was confusing me is the existing switches for the pool pump and polaris pump. I'm thinking I'll bypass the existing switch for the pool pump and just use the timer as a switch.

Last question (I hope)...I had work done on the pool tile last fall right before close up. It involved emptying and refilling the pool and immediately closing up for the winter. The guy that winterized the pool told me he added something to the water to keep it in good shape for the winter. None the less, when I looked at it today it was green. My question is, should I add chlorine etc and get the water back in shape before turning on the chlorine generator and adding the salt or should I go ahead and activate the chlorine generator while the water is green but has no chlorine in it?

Thanks again,

djdixon1995

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Thanks again...makes sense to have the polaris pump seperate. I think I'll leave that one off the timer altogether. I think what was confusing me is the existing switches for the pool pump and polaris pump. I'm thinking I'll bypass the existing switch for the pool pump and just use the timer as a switch.

Last question (I hope)...I had work done on the pool tile last fall right before close up. It involved emptying and refilling the pool and immediately closing up for the winter. The guy that winterized the pool told me he added something to the water to keep it in good shape for the winter. None the less, when I looked at it today it was green. My question is, should I add chlorine etc and get the water back in shape before turning on the chlorine generator and adding the salt or should I go ahead and activate the chlorine generator while the water is green but has no chlorine in it?

Thanks again,

djdixon1995

I'd just go ahead and shock it with granular chlorine and hit it with a good dose of copper based algaecide and vac up the dead algae after a few days....you can turn on the saltwater chlorinator whenever you like...

also make sure the other parameters of your water...alkalinity, hardness, & stabilizer are in check

cheers,

Chris

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  • 11 years later...

I have a new Coleman 22foot round pool 52” deep so that’s about 10500 gallons I have a Intex salt water generator with sand pump filter that only produces chlorine for 7000 gallons can I daisy change two chlorinators together another 7000 gallon one to make up the difference? Thanks.

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