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So Confused About All The Chemicals


robin4747
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I have had my new 475 gallon spa for 2 years. It has an ozonater. I have owned a spa for over 20 years. I use a brominating floater. So on first fill I clean the tub walls with some bleach and water. then rinse that all out. After fill I adjust alkaline with alkaline up. Then check ph and add a product called PH Proper that holds the PH for almost 2 months(or some times I skip this). Then I add the bromine floater.

Here's my issues; Should I use Dichloro or bleach(which I am reading about on the forum)?

I am nervous about using the dichloro after reading the lable. I have never

used dichloro before.

Do I still us non-clorine shock( which I do now)?

Which product REALLY clarifies the spa? I have actually used and old one I had

called In The Swim Pool clarifier. It works super fast to remove all soap and

scum. I called IN THE SWIM and they said I could use it in a hot tub.

The hot tub clearifiers just don't seem to work as well.

I have hardwater up product that I have not used but I will on this new fill.

Since my hardwater reading is low everytime.

And lastly is there any thing I should use with the above products to soften

the water(20 Mule?) I don't have a problem but my friends seem to when

they are in the water they complain of a SLIGHT itchy feeling.

I realize so many of these questions have been answered but each time people write in there is always a twist ie; a wood tub,have nature 2 filter, etc. So I am being selfish in asking for an answer to just MY situation and what products I like. Actually I would like to go to a new line of products that are considered environmentally friendly when my bromine tabs run out. So if anyone can steer me in that direction for the future let me know. Thanks!

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I'm not an expert, I'm a newbie climbing the learning curve. I use a similar system. As I understand it, the fill sequence is:

Add water

add a metal sequestrant (Metal Gon for example)

add sodium bromide (this is important!) This establishes a reserve and allows your bromine tablets and shock to work.

adjust total alkalinity

adjust pH

add a pH locker if you like.

add your floater with bromine tablets

One thing to be aware of, though, is that there are 2 kinds of "clarifying" products you can use. One is designed to get rid of soap scum and oils and is usually labeled something like Enzyme and the other is designed to make very tiny particles stick together and filter out more easily and this works if the water is just dull looking. Read the labels, it should be fairly clear what you are buying.

You didn't mention how often you clean your filter? I'm finding I want to at least rinse it off fairly often.

You definitely need to shock with something. I'm using a non-chlorine shock and I'm happy with it.

How often do you test your free bromine level? I use 4-way test strips despite the fact that people on this board argue vehemently that you do much better with a reagent kit. I may eventually go that way, but I find the strips give me enough info easily to stay on top of it. If your friends feel itchy and the water is clear it is more likely that they are sensitive to a high level of bromine in the water rather than the hardness of it.

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I'm not an expert, I'm a newbie climbing the learning curve. I use a similar system. As I understand it, the fill sequence is:

Add water

add a metal sequestrant (Metal Gon for example)

add sodium bromide (this is important!) This establishes a reserve and allows your bromine tablets and shock to work.

adjust total alkalinity

adjust pH

add a pH locker if you like.

add your floater with bromine tablets

One thing to be aware of, though, is that there are 2 kinds of "clarifying" products you can use. One is designed to get rid of soap scum and oils and is usually labeled something like Enzyme and the other is designed to make very tiny particles stick together and filter out more easily and this works if the water is just dull looking. Read the labels, it should be fairly clear what you are buying.

You didn't mention how often you clean your filter? I'm finding I want to at least rinse it off fairly often.

You definitely need to shock with something. I'm using a non-chlorine shock and I'm happy with it.

How often do you test your free bromine level? I use 4-way test strips despite the fact that people on this board argue vehemently that you do much better with a reagent kit. I may eventually go that way, but I find the strips give me enough info easily to stay on top of it. If your friends feel itchy and the water is clear it is more likely that they are sensitive to a high level of bromine in the water rather than the hardness of it.

thanks for this info. Do you always use metal gon. I know the product but I have not used it with this new 2 year old tub as it was not a suggestion from the dealer. I have not used the tub since I put in the new water a few days ago. All levels are good right now but I would like to add the metal gon if you think it would help. Many times here I read that Alkaline is the FIRST thing you worry about. So at start up i add the sodium bromide and metal gon and after that then test the alkaline as you have suggested? Anyway right now can I still add the metal gone and sodium bromide since the water is new and unused. I am just on a mission to have the cleanest water ever. I clean the filters often.
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As I understand it, the metal sequestrant basically pulls metal contaminants out of the water -- your water may or may not need it, but my dealer suggested it.

Sodium bromide is always added at startup. It shouldn't affect total alkalinity or pH. Note that pH is also a measure of alkalinity, it's the TOTAL alkalinity you want to adjust before you worry about pH. That's what that rule really means.

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As I understand it, the metal sequestrant basically pulls metal contaminants out of the water -- your water may or may not need it, but my dealer suggested it.

Sodium bromide is always added at startup. It shouldn't affect total alkalinity or pH. Note that pH is also a measure of alkalinity, it's the TOTAL alkalinity you want to adjust before you worry about pH. That's what that rule really means.

[/quo thanks for your help! Thanks again for your help and advice.

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