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New InnovaSpa Storm HH Error Code


Margol
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Thank you for reply. Checked both fuses. Its running 240, checked volts. When i unplug the heater sensor and plug back in the pump/jets start but get a HH and IC error. Not heating. So im thinking bad circuit or sensors. Also no air lock there is water in the hearing element.

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The pack is currently wired to run a 120V pump not 240V pump. Is your pump 120V rated or 240V. You will need to read the white tag on the pump to confirm it's voltage. If the pump is 240V you need to move W1 from White AC section where it is currently connected down to the Red AC Section. If it is a 120V pump it is wired correct. Power off to make change if needed.

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Thanks for reply. The pump is wired for 240v. I have two hots(red and black), the white is neutral and the ground. I've also disconnected the jumper wire and the last switch(10) on the rectangular thing to down per instructions. I basically did what this gentleman show in the video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zBlRBQ5ilvg

I bought it at namco, of course i contacted their customer support as well, but they are dragging their feet.

thank you

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make it 3

your pump is wired for 110 volts.

White is not Neutral, White should be "common"

If you continue to "Low Volt" the pump, it will die a horrible death.

If this is how it came from the factory,....they were wrong.

....(Sorry, it's been a bad day)

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Sorry brothers for my ignorance. I understand what you are saying now. I took a closer look at the wire diagram.

I'm just going to add more color to this which I should of done earlier.

1.) The tub came as a 120v plug and play(with recommended conversion to 240). So its a 120v pump. Does that mean it can also run 240v? What are the benefits of running 240? Either way will check the pump tomorrow as you noted. I don't want to move that wire and cause damage if its 120v only. From my pictures, is the heater wired correctly for 240v? I thought the heater only benefits from the 240.

2.) Got same error HH with the plug and play(120) setup, water is cold, with default settings. Which is why automatically assumed its a bad board or sensors.

I ordered 2 sensors which I will test Wednesday. Fingers crossed. I'm also chasing down the distributor tech support.

Thank you all for chiming in.

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1 hour ago, Margol said:

Sorry brothers for my ignorance.

Apology accepted.

1 hour ago, Margol said:

So its a 120v pump. Does that mean it can also run 240v?

Only if it's a dual voltage motor, which it is not if it's a 2 speed motor. So, not in this case. You would have to replace the motor.

The only advantage is lower amp draw on a single leg, so you can run more equipment on the same size breaker. Not an issue for your single pump spa, so I would not run out and buy one, but when it's time to replace it you can use a 240v.

1 hour ago, Margol said:

Which is why automatically assumed its a bad board or sensors.

HH could be sensors, but it's unusual for your circumstances. A bad sensor usually triggers different errors at start up, and HH is usually an overheat in the heater itself from it turning on with no flow. I'd test them, or plug in new ones, to see, but I doubt that's it. HH should only come up after the heater is on, which is after the pump is on, unless both sensors are bad by the exact same amount, or the board logic is bad (both equally unlikely). It's not turning on the pump, you said, so that's the real issue, I suspect. 

To test it, disconnect the heater, or in this case the main red power wire will do. If you still get HH then it's sensors or new board. But if not, it's a pump or heater issue, which could still be the board, just a different part of it.

Next, with red still disconnected and no HH, test voltage to the pump at the board (with it unplugged) from black terminal to white at start-up. Hit any button with your tester leads already in place so you don't miss it, as the pump should get voltage immediately after you press a button (but not before) and before it engages the heater. If it does, it's the pump. If not, the board (likely a bad pump relay).

Finally, with breaker off, place test leads between main red terminal (with wire disconnected) and white, and have someone turn on power. If you immediately read 120v you have a stuck heater relay.

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Thanks for response. 

1.) Changed sensors, same issue.

2.) Tech stopped by said it was main board. Order new board.

 

I have a question. On the main panel 50 amp breaker I noticed that both the ground/copper wire and neuttral/white wire for the hot tub are going to the ground bar? Is that correct. Shouldn't the neutral be going to the neutral bar?

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Where is your GFCI? In the main panel or in a sub panel? If it's in the main panel, the neutral wire should be going to the neutral connection of the GFCI breaker and the pigtail from the GFCI should go to the neutral bar.

Other than that, the neutral should be going to the neutral bus bar but if the neutral bar is bonded to the panel, electrically, that's the same as going to the ground bus bar.

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GFCI is in sub panel. See attachment of sub panel, and the main panel. You will see that in the main panel the neutral and ground are both going to the right/ground bar. So the only wire in question is that neutral. So I know the subpanel is wired correctly. So my question is, in the main panel should that neutral from the subpanel go directly to the neautral bar, or to the breaker and from the breaker to the neutral bar? And also does that wire need to be #6? Thank you IMG_3722.thumb.JPG.14fb8e7f3555422d9e96aa618addd331.JPGIMG_3728.thumb.JPG.319be345f57a6da5d946b193cd7face8.JPG

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Depending on how far away the tub is from the main panel, it should be either #6 or #8. Using #6 won't hurt anything.

I'm not seeing the bus bars in the main panel but what I do see appears to be another GFCI on the tub circuit. It's not a code violation and it works fine but it can be confusing in a ground fault situation. In general, I'm not a fan of a breaker feeding a breaker like this but there isn't anything wrong with it.

If the breaker in the main panel is a GFCI, then the neutral from the sub panel will go to the breaker and the pig tail from the breaker goes to the neutral bus bar.

In your sub panel, the neutral bus bar does not appear to be bonded to the panel so that's why your neutral is separate from the ground. Your main panel could very well be different. 

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Thanks for reply. Have a spare 50amp breaker non-gfci so i will replace it in the main panel. Then just attach the neutral to the neutral bar and ground to ground bar in main panel and be done with it. 
 

Also noticed the ground from main to sub is like a 10 you can kind of see it in the pic. The ground from sub to hot tub will be a 6. 

Is that a problem?

 

thank you

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2 hours ago, Margol said:

Thanks for reply. Have a spare 50amp breaker non-gfci so i will replace it in the main panel. Then just attach the neutral to the neutral bar and ground to ground bar in main panel and be done with it. 
 

Also noticed the ground from main to sub is like a 10 you can kind of see it in the pic. The ground from sub to hot tub will be a 6. 

Is that a problem?

 

thank you

Your plan is fine. Go for it.

The ground wire is not a problem. If you bought something like 6-3 with ground romex wire, the bare ground is always at least one size smaller gauge.

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  • 4 weeks later...
  • 1 month later...

Hi!  I have no experience on electrical or hot tubs so I thank you for your expertise.  I live in AZ, the coldest time of the year is now.  Luckily I have access to a 240 v unused within a couple of feet from where I will put the tub.  Innovaspa Storm is to be deliver this Thursday, and electrical install for Friday.  Any recommendation on leaving it at 110 or upgrading?  I don't want to mess anything up.

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240V will heat faster and recover faster. That's the biggest benefit of going 240V.

I have had both 110V and 220V spa's. The 220V spa is far better in heating than the 110V spa ever was.

If that 240V line is capable of 50-60A, I would not hesitate to install the spa as a 240V setup.

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