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Proper start up procedure link from waterbear?


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  • mscdman changed the title to Proper start up procedure link from waterbear?

I will write one up and pin it once I have the time. RIght now I have company from out of town so my time is limited. The board changed ownership several years back and many of the pinned posts were removed. I did have a post on bromine for beginners if that is what you are looking for.

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22 hours ago, mscdman said:

It was already written.  Maybe it was @chem geek?

No, I wrote it several years back. It was posted here and also on TFP from when I was  mod there (from  when TPF was still owned by the person who started it. )Not sure if it is still on TFP or not. I don't frequent that board anymore.

This board changed ownership several years back and many of the pinned posts were removed. I will rewrite it and repost it as soon as I get a chance within the next weeks.

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  • 1 month later...

Thank you!  I just got it drained and refilled yesterday.  This time I got the proper ranges from the start hopefully. 
 

adjusted TA up from 50 to 90 - to account for bromine floater lower PH fall

adjusted CH up to 120 

PH was good.

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K2005 uses the DPD test method. K2006/K2106 uses FAS-DPD testing which is not subject to bleachout at high sanitizer levels (DPD tests will bleach out making you think that sanitizer is low or non existent when in reality is at shock levels). DPD testing uses color blocks of shades of red, and most men are unable to distinguish them (FACT!) and is not usable by those suffering from color blindness. FAS-DPD testing is a drop counting test with a distinct color change from pink to colorless DPD testing is limited to the precision of the color blocks. FAS-DPD testing has a precision of .2 ppm or .5 ppm (K2006) or .5 ppm or 1.25 ppm (K2106) depending on whether the sample is 10 ml or 25 ml.  All other tests are the same in the kits with the exception of CYA test not being included in the k2106 since its not needed for bromine.. Once you try FAD-DPD testing you never go back to DPD.

You can get a Taylor K1515A stand alone FAS-DPD test kit and just test for FC and then multiply the results by 2.25 to get total bromine.

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40 minutes ago, mscdman said:

adjusted TA up from 50 to 90 - to account for bromine floater lower PH fall

with the aeration in a tub that might be a bit high. Bromine tabs are acidic but if you test your TA every week to month (depending on how fast it changes in YOUR spa. Start with weekly and if it is stable go to every two weeks, and if stable monthly) and adjust it as needed and you will have better pH stability in the 50 to 70 range rather than setting it at 90. IF you pH is remaining stable at 90 and not always rising and requiring acid then you are fine but you should not have to be lowering pH more often than perhaps every month or so.

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45 minutes ago, waterbear said:

K2005 uses the DPD test method. K2006/K2106 uses FAS-DPD testing which is not subject to bleachout at high sanitizer levels (DPD tests will bleach out making you think that sanitizer is low or non existent when in reality is at shock levels). DPD testing uses color blocks of shades of red, and most men are unable to distinguish them (FACT!) and is not usable by those suffering from color blindness. FAS-DPD testing is a drop counting test with a distinct color change from pink to colorless DPD testing is limited to the precision of the color blocks. FAS-DPD testing has a precision of .2 ppm or .5 ppm (K2006) or .5 ppm or 1.25 ppm (K2106) depending on whether the sample is 10 ml or 25 ml.  All other tests are the same in the kits with the exception of CYA test not being included in the k2106 since its not needed for bromine.. Once you try FAD-DPD testing you never go back to DPD.

You can get a Taylor K1515A stand alone FAS-DPD test kit and just test for FC and then multiply the results by 2.25 to get total bromine.

Interesting.    Good thing I can differentiate shades of red :)  and when I test PH, CH, TA etc. I make sure my sanitizer levels are not high.  
 

ive not had any issues yet

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22 hours ago, mscdman said:

Good thing I can differentiate shades of red

IF you are male chances are you cannot but can learn to unless you have worked with color before. There is a way to dilute your samples with distlled water to test when sanitizer is high. Look on the lid of your kit for instructions. It is cumbersome and time consuming, IMHO. IF you see a flash of red that disappears when you add the reagent to your sample it is indicative of bleachout and you need to do a dilution test. It happens more often than you think it might. There are two dilutions, 1:1 and 1:5 marked on the comparator.

Here are some videos from Taylor Technologies that discuss the dilutions.

https://www.taylortechnologies.com/en/page/230/k-2005-complete-kit-with-liquid-dpd

Pay particular attention to the chlorine test interference video in the link below:

https://www.taylortechnologies.com/en/page/235/general-test-interferences

The FAS-DPD method can directly test up to about 25 ppm FC levels (and the equivalent in total bromine) without dilutions or beachout problems. When sanitizer is beyond the limits of the test it goes off color and brownish.This is the reason I recommend this test and strongly recommend getting the K1515A as an add on to your K2005. Also, if you elect to use MPS you MUST add the Monopersulfate Interference Remover (for 2000 Series kitsK-2041  (.75 oz) or K-2042 (2 oz) and use it whenever testing sanitizer levels because MPS will test as chlorine/bromine and give a false reading unless the interference is removed.

The K2041 will fit inside the case of the K2005 and the k2042 fits in the service k2005 with 2 oz reagent bottles. However the 2 oz size reagent pack is only a few dollars more (about $5 in the US) so it's a better value for the money if you are willing to give up the convenience of storing the reagent i the main test kit.

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