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Zogman

Replacement High Current GFCI

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So my father in-laws spa is about 15 years old. It was made by US tooling and Spas.   His high current GFCI is bad and I am unable to find him a replacement GFCI.  It's a Leviton 8895-E.  The Leviton site and everywhere else I search says it's obsolete without a replacement.  Since the GFCI is crucial and I'm not comfortable with just putting in a regular GFCI in it, does anyone have any ideas??

As a note, the 8895 has a donut on the back of it for the high current lines to go through them. I have attached a picture.

Any thoughts would be appreciated.

Thanks

 

GFCI_HC_M.jpg

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http://www.homedepot.com/p/Eaton-60-Amp-4-Circuit-Type-CH-Spa-Panel-with-Self-Test-2P-GFCI-CH60SPAST/206696152?MERCH=REC-_-PIPHorizontal1_rr-_-206184042-_-206696152-_-N

Don't screw around with GFCI's.  It's your life you're protecting.  Saving a few bucks to find a "maybe replacement" for an "obsolete" breaker won't be a great savings to your family while they're looking at you in a casket.

Buy new, buy modern and don't cut corners on electrical safety.

My two cents, for what it's worth.

Dave

 

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Thanks Dave.  I'm definitely not looking to cut corners.  That's why I asked what the heck replaced this part.   That box is a 60 amp panel.  Does that mean I need to buy an additional 120V 20 AMP GFCI to go into it?  I'm kinda lost on how this replaces it since it looks like I just end up putting in a regular GFCI breaker.  Please take a look at the link below, your thoughts would be appreciated.

https://globalcommercialparts.com/hatco-r02-01-221-gfci-switch-retrofit-kit.html

Thanks

 

Zoli

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Hey Jerry.  Thanks for helping on this.  The spa is 240v hard wired.  It has an older Nu-wave spa controller on it and the gfci on the controller is what is bad. In looking at it, the gfci is a 120v unit but the 220v lines go through the back of the donut on the gfci ad an added precaution.  I tried to attach a pic but it's to large  it's a Supreme Series controller  

That being said it looks like Nu-wave make replacement controllers that look very similar and they even have a gfci in the same exact spot.  i did a quick web search and can't find a nu-wave web site for tech support. 

 

Any thoughts would be appreciated. 

thanks

zoli

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I'm not an electrician, so take this as the advice of a random person on the internet.
The solution is to throw away the old GFCI, and install a GFCI in the circuit breaker panel of the same amperage as the current circuit breaker. It'll cost you $50-$100, but it's the modern and safest approach. If "replace circuit breaker" is not one of your strengths, call an electrician to do it for you - maybe another $50-$100.
You really don't want to have a spa without it being protected by a good GFCI.

Jersey Hot Tub's suggested solution is similar - it's a new box that you'd mount near the spa. Run the wires from the main breaker panel into the new box (with a built-in GFCI), run wires out of the new box to the spa, and you're good to go.

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Ha !!!  My 1988 CalSpa did not come new with a GFCI for the tub, just one for the light !!!   Mine's 40-amp, 240 VAC hard-wired, done by professional electricians who also ran the 240 VAC wires through my attic.

I read about GFCI for spas in Popular Mechanics magazine a few years later, and added my own 40-amp GFCI for the tub/heater/pump etc.  Well, at least I have a shut-off close now, my GFCI is inside my redwood cabinet.  My Cutler-Hammer circuit breaker box is like 75 feet away, on the other side of the backyard wall.

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i have the same situation.if i already have a 50 amp gfci external breaker can this just be taken out and bypassed

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I'd recommend you contact the spa manufacturer and get a written response telling you if your 50 amp GFCI external breaker is a replacement for the existing one.  The reason I say that is because the tub was designed for safety "as built."   If it's UL Listed, it meets a specific build requirement that you shouldn't be modifying.

If you modify things and something bad happens, your liability is exponential.  Worst case:  there's something in the design you're unaware of and you remove the GFCI.  Your family uses the tub and while someone is getting out and one leg's in the water and the other wet foot is touching the ground, you learn that your modification was a mistake and a loved one gets electrocuted.   A law enforcement or insurance inspection finds that you removed the GFCI, and even though a stranger on the internet said it was safe to do, you find yourself getting arrested for manslaughter as you're driving home from your family's funeral.

If you have to ask "is it safe," then you shouldn't be doing it.  Just a little friendly advice from a risk-averse hot tub repair guy.

Dave

 

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Usually most tubs require a 50amp double pull breaker from your existing inside panel.  6 gauge wire is usually used to feed this breaker and wired to run to your hot tub.  This then feeds a disconnect box on the outside of your house.  Depending how your tub runs, you typically have a 30amp 240v GFCI breaker inside and then usually a 20amp GFCI breaker for the 120v side.  The disconnect needs to be 5' min away from the closest water part of the tub for safety and to meet code.

The easiest method, but not to code would be below....

It sounds like you already have a 240v direct line and were using a plug to go into a 120v GFCI.

What I would suggest is buying a spa disconnect box, wire your 240v into it with the correct sized breaker.  If the cable is not long enough you could use a metal box and conduit to extend the wires to the location needed.  I would then suggest plugging your 120v side of your tub into a regular 120v GFCI if you already have one close by and that's how your tub is setup.  This would keep you safe.

I used to be a commercial electrician before switching trades a few years back.

The second method saves you about $50 and some time.  The first method is the ideal method and meets code.

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On 2/17/2018 at 4:35 PM, Cusser said:

Ha !!!  My 1988 CalSpa did not come new with a GFCI for the tub, just one for the light !!!   Mine's 40-amp, 240 VAC hard-wired, done by professional electricians who also ran the 240 VAC wires through my attic.

I read about GFCI for spas in Popular Mechanics magazine a few years later, and added my own 40-amp GFCI for the tub/heater/pump etc.  Well, at least I have a shut-off close now, my GFCI is inside my redwood cabinet.  My Cutler-Hammer circuit breaker box is like 75 feet away, on the other side of the backyard wall.

DSC06599_zpstk4qus5n.jpg

 

DSC06598_zps52iy7e2z.jpg

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