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Pool Light Gfci - Electric Question


Jdub
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Let me first say that I am not attempting to do any electrical work myself, but my landlord sends his general maintenance guy to do the electric work on the pool. I'd like to be able to know if he's doing the work correctly.

Our light went out a few months ago and a pool guy came out last week to replace it. He tried to check the GFCI but we don't have one. He wouldn't replace the light and recommended an electrician. The junction box is a few feet from the pool and is a box with a front cover (no GFCI). The light switch is in a breaker box that is dedicated to the pump and light. Do I just need a GFCI receptacle in the junction box, or is it not that simple? The house was built in the 60's. I don't know how old the pool is but it's possibly as old as the house. I am purchasing the house soon and want the work done correctly.

Also, the front cover has not been on the junction box. Ii think it's been off for a few months and I'm wondering if water got in and behind the light. Would that cause the light to go out? I got a cover and fixed it yesterday.

Thanks for any feedback....

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You need a GFCI on the light, wherever it goes back to the equipment pad...somewhere in the circuit for the light. If water got into the junction box, it could be causing the breaker to trip, but not necessarily damaging the light itself, although it could also damage the light.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Yes that might be a problem you should put the cover back on the box and if it is missing you should get a new cover. You should never have 230 volts of power exposed the the elements. Also yes it is just as simple as that and if you get one of those books that they have at Home Depot about electrical you could probably do it yourself.

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The pool light should work off 12 - 14 volts AC. No way will it or should it be working off 110 or 220 volts! There should be a heavy duty transformer somewhere - in your poolhouse or similar. I believe Canadian codes require a GFCI in the circuit breaker box feeding the transformer. Depending how yours is wired, the pool light switch may be switching the 110V to the transformer, or possibly switching the 12 to 14 volts between the transformer and the underwater light.

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The pool light should work off 12 - 14 volts AC. No way will it or should it be working off 110 or 220 volts! There should be a heavy duty transformer somewhere - in your poolhouse or similar. I believe Canadian codes require a GFCI in the circuit breaker box feeding the transformer. Depending how yours is wired, the pool light switch may be switching the 110V to the transformer, or possibly switching the 12 to 14 volts between the transformer and the underwater light.

 

You know that they sell 500 watt 120 volt pool lights right? Because they do go look them up. We have a 120 volt led pool light that has the transformer right in the Light so no worries. If you pool is as old as you say it is I I will most likely have a 120 volt light in the pool that does not change color.

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You don't need a GFCI receptacle.

It is required per code (National Electrical Code) that you have GFCI protection, which could be built-in into a receptacle or could be built-in into a breaker. That's what you want to do, to get a breaker with GFCI protection.

I would recommend to you hiring an electrician, it takes the risk/liability away from you (you're renting, right?).

The junction box is meant to tie together the water proof cable (from your waterproof fixture) and the cable coming from the power distribution panel (good ol' romex cable).

Hope it helps.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Hire a Licensed Electrician to troubleshoot and repair the light system. I am a licensed commercial pool contractor, and I call electricians for my own repairs. It's not that I don't know to repair them, it's the liablilty I face if something goes wrong and someone is hurt.

Mike

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