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Master Spas No Microban?


JOKERSOAKER
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I see only Aristech colors and any mention of Microban has been removed from the Master Spas website. Is this because Master Spas uses mostly Aristech now vs Lucite? I know of a couple of Master Spas dealers who still say Master Spas has Microban in the shell....Can anyone confirm that Master Spas no longer has MIcroban in their Aristech color options or all together?

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It's nothing more than something to sell anyway. While the concept seems to makes sense it really does nothing to prevent bacteria growth so I hear.

I respectfully disagree. To me, there seems to be much more research suggesting Microban is effective than not. We are getting off topic though...The question at hand is, do Master Spas no longer have Microban available in most of their shells? Yes or No? It would be could to hear from the factory themselves on this.

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It's nothing more than something to sell anyway. While the concept seems to makes sense it really does nothing to prevent bacteria growth so I hear.

I respectfully disagree. To me, there seems to be much more research suggesting Microban is effective than not. We are getting off topic though...The question at hand is, do Master Spas no longer have Microban available in most of their shells? Yes or No? It would be could to hear from the factory themselves on this.

I have not heard a thing, maybe it was a cost cutting decision.

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It's nothing more than something to sell anyway. While the concept seems to makes sense it really does nothing to prevent bacteria growth so I hear.

I respectfully disagree. To me, there seems to be much more research suggesting Microban is effective than not. We are getting off topic though...The question at hand is, do Master Spas no longer have Microban available in most of their shells? Yes or No? It would be could to hear from the factory themselves on this.

I have not heard a thing, maybe it was a cost cutting decision.

Kind of weird, it had a strong presence on their website and suddenly disappeared...

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It's nothing more than something to sell anyway. While the concept seems to makes sense it really does nothing to prevent bacteria growth so I hear.

I respectfully disagree. To me, there seems to be much more research suggesting Microban is effective than not. We are getting off topic though...The question at hand is, do Master Spas no longer have Microban available in most of their shells? Yes or No? It would be could to hear from the factory themselves on this.

There's nothing to sell hear so you will never hear from the factory on a site like this.

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It's nothing more than something to sell anyway. While the concept seems to makes sense it really does nothing to prevent bacteria growth so I hear.

I respectfully disagree. To me, there seems to be much more research suggesting Microban is effective than not.

Really??? Anything relatively current and from independent, peer reviewed, scientific sources? Or just from the manufacturer and from those that use it in their products?

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It's nothing more than something to sell anyway. While the concept seems to makes sense it really does nothing to prevent bacteria growth so I hear.

I respectfully disagree. To me, there seems to be much more research suggesting Microban is effective than not.

Really??? Anything relatively current and from independent, peer reviewed, scientific sources? Or just from the manufacturer and from those that use it in their products?

Microbiology Testing All products engineered with Microban® technology undergo testing to validate the effectiveness of the product as required by the EPA, which governs the usage of antimicrobial products. All products are tested using approved industry standard testing methods.

Bacteria Results Lucite samples were evaluated using the Kirby Bauer test method to evaluate the effectiveness against bacteria that can cause stains and odors on the acrylic surface. The samples below were inoculated with bacteria and then photographed after 24 hours according to test protocol (photographs were altered to change white acrylic background to blue for better visual reference of bacteria colonies). The sample on the left was untreated and shows significant contamination. The sample on the right was manufactured with built-in Microban® protection and shows virtually no growth on or around the sample.

You can read more here:

http://www.modernplastics.com/oct09/expertscorner.html?src=oct09-whatismicroban

Also read this:

Steps have already been taken towards this vision of a germ-free future. Sainsbury and Marks & Spencer are both planning to sell products such as chopping boards, dishcloths and towel mats impregnated with Microban, which kills 99 per cent of bacteria, including those implicated in food poisoning. The active ingredient, Triclosan, can be bonded into synthetic fibres during manufacture, and its antibacterial properties are constantly replenished (even after washing) as its molecules rise to the surface.

Developed in the United States (of course), Microban can also be used in toys and could in future beincorporated into kitchen surfaces, floors and cupboards. Tests have shown that when a Microban chopping board was infected with E coli 157 (the one associated with minced beef), the number of bacteria fell over 24 hours from 100,000 to 50. On an untreated board they rose to 10 billion.

You can see more from this article here:

http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/health-and-families/health-news/health-the-truth-about---killing-germs-1262498.html

I dont think that Microban is the end all be all, but I do think that it cant hurt any, and can only help.

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Micorban is a trade name for triclosan, a chorinanted araomatic compound, when it is incluced in plastics, building materials, clothing, etc. Triclosan came into wide use in the 70s after hexachorophene was banned in most consumer products such as deodorant soaps and skin cleansers (anyone remember pHsohex and Dial soap in the 60s and early 70s?). In fact, its use was about as widespread as triclosan's today and was in just about every 'antibacterial' product on themarket . It was found to be extremely neurotoxic and was shown to be the cause of brain damage and death in infants since it was readily absorbed through the skin (and its use in baby products was almost universal). Trilcosan was developed as a 'safer', if not as effective, replacement.

Trichlosan has been found to be fairly slow to degrade in the environment and forms dioxins as a break down product. Its use ranges from everything from toothpaste, soaps and cosmetics to plastics, construction materials, carpeting, dish detergents, hand santizers, and (incredibly so) in spas! There are concerns with it's widespread use because of evidence of bacterial resistance developing (like what happened because of the indiscriminate use of antibiotics that brought us the 'superbugs' we have today like MERSA!), not to mention the many health risks associated with its use such as endocrine disruption, toxicity, and possible carcinogenicity. It's environmental effects have been well documented and it has been found in dolphins in Florida and Carolina in levels known to cause hormone, growth, and development problems.

The Canadian Medical Association has been calling for a ban on triclosan (which would include Microban branded products) since 2009 and Health Canada and Environment Canada have been moving forward with limiting its use as of 2012 so this could explain why it has disappeared from Master Spas since its inclusion could affect Canadian sales. Health Canada's preliminary study said there were no health risks from its use in consumer products (anyone surprised by this finding? they don't want a big consumer scare, do they?) BUT Environment Canada had concerns about its effect on the environment and widespread industrial use and if you read their fndings it seems they are looking at alternatives and ways to limit the use of trichlosan.

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The first link is a company selling it...and the link specifically says;

"Microban® antimicrobial product protection inhibits the growth of bacteria, mold and mildew that can cause stains and odors on the acrylic surface. Microban® technology makes Lucite acrylic surfaces easier to clean and keeps them cleaner between cleanings."

There's also a slightly incorrect statement of, "Acrylic is a non-porous surface". While this is true of flat acrylic sheets, the process of thermoforming causes the acrylic to become porous.

The second link...The second paragraph is in direct violation of EPA guidelines (as outlined in your first link :-)..and as the article is written and published by a new agency (in the UK to boot), one could easily say, welcome to sensationalism and the creation of advertising revenue.

As far as "I do think that it cant hurt any, and can only help", based on waterbear's info, this may not be so true. All the testing I've seen has to do with "stuff" growing in the surface of relatively dry acrylic. There's very little, if any, tests about sitting in a tub water with it, or being in direct contact with it for long periods of time.

Here's something interesting;

http://www.beyondpesticides.org/pesticides/factsheets/Triclosan%20cited.pdf

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The first link is a company selling it...and the link specifically says;

"Microban® antimicrobial product protection inhibits the growth of bacteria, mold and mildew that can cause stains and odors on the acrylic surface. Microban® technology makes Lucite acrylic surfaces easier to clean and keeps them cleaner between cleanings."

There's also a slightly incorrect statement of, "Acrylic is a non-porous surface". While this is true of flat acrylic sheets, the process of thermoforming causes the acrylic to become porous.

The second link...The second paragraph is in direct violation of EPA guidelines (as outlined in your first link :-)..and as the article is written and published by a new agency (in the UK to boot), one could easily say, welcome to sensationalism and the creation of advertising revenue.

As far as "I do think that it cant hurt any, and can only help", based on waterbear's info, this may not be so true. All the testing I've seen has to do with "stuff" growing in the surface of relatively dry acrylic. There's very little, if any, tests about sitting in a tub water with it, or being in direct contact with it for long periods of time.

Here's something interesting;

http://www.beyondpesticides.org/pesticides/factsheets/Triclosan%20cited.pdf

Very Interesting. Well, I said the, "it cant hurt" line before reading Waterbear and your posts. That is all good to know information. I would say based on those two posts, and the one from above where Canada is already trying to get it banned, that Microban will be no more in a few years. Could be wrong. Maybe it will be tweaked, but I would bet some changes are coming at least.

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As a Canadian on this forum - I thought triclosan was already banned here in Canada - I got all the soaps and sanitizers containing it out of my house quite a while ago. I suspect it still exists in places I haven't found yet!

Thank you Waterbear for letting me know that isn't the case as of yet! I hope it will be soon as I was one of the unlucky ones to get a superbug 6 months ago.

I would have run the other way if it was in the spa I was buying!

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As a Canadian on this forum - I thought triclosan was already banned here in Canada - I got all the soaps and sanitizers containing it out of my house quite a while ago. I suspect it still exists in places I haven't found yet!

Thank you Waterbear for letting me know that isn't the case as of yet! I hope it will be soon as I was one of the unlucky ones to get a superbug 6 months ago.

I would have run the other way if it was in the spa I was buying!

Talk about taking it completely the other way. Just like it won't help keep your water clean it also won't oozze out of your acrylic shell and kill you.

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  • 4 weeks later...

Let's suppose your shell was made of something germs couldn't grow on.

So what? There is more surface area in that 600+ft of plumbing in your spa for stuff to grow on than there ever will be where you can see it.

How can we feed this thru the BS detector?

Name one spa manufacturer that guarantees germs can't grow on their shell.

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Let's suppose your shell was made of something germs couldn't grow on.

So what? There is more surface area in that 600+ft of plumbing in your spa for stuff to grow on than there ever will be where you can see it.

How can we feed this thru the BS detector?

Name one spa manufacturer that guarantees germs can't grow on their shell.

EXCELLENT point!

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