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Average Kwh To Operate A Tub?


njmurvin
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I thought I saw some statistics on the average daily/weekly KWH used to keep a tub hot and filter it. I tried to search for it but can't seem to locate it. I just received the highest electric bill I have ever had and would like to know just how much of that my new Marquis Everyday 660 is responsible for. I'm looking for some guidance on KWH used per hour of filtration and KWH used to raise the temp of a 350gal spa n degrees (I can do the math for my particular situation). However, I don't really know how much drop in temp I experience daily with my spa. My average temps this past month hovered around 55 and the spa is set for 102. My rate per KWH is probably the highest on the planet (So Cal Edison Tier 5= .31). FWIW, mine has the fully foamed option and usage has been practically nil. So, the cover is on 99.9% of the time (i.e. only off during maintenance). The spa is set to Economy mode (heats only during filtration cycles) and it filters 2hrs twice per day.

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agree,...what size heater, insulation (even full foams vary from different foam types) cover, outside temp, how windy, whats it set on, how much sun does it get, how often is it used and so on and so on

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Of course this is a rough estimate, but my 300 gallon hotspring uses about 100 kwh per month based on historical usage data. We set it to 100 and use it for 30-30 minutes about 5 times per week. On months when I empty and refill, my electric usage shoots up by about an additional 75-100 kwh. Not enough historical date to quantify with certainty, but I bet most of that additional 75-100 kwh is due to heating from refill. Hope this helps a little.

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Well, I've been doing a bit of research and I've found quite a variance in estimated (and measured) power usages for hot tubs. I have seen monthly estimates varying from 100kwh (above) to 600kwh. The consensus seems to be somewhere in the middle (and a few were measured in California where I reside) at around 300kwh. For those who have low power rates (.07/kwh), this would be no big deal. But, for me, my marginal rate for electricity is .31/kwh. So, this amount of usage puts me at close to $100/month. I did see a couple of posters say that they bought temp readers and noticed that their Covermate 3 cover lifters were holding the center up slightly and preventing a good seal. I use this cover lifter and wonder if mine could be doing this.

What is the absolute minimum running time per day that a spa should have (very low usage)? It is currently set to run twice a day for 2hrs each. Heater is set to ECO which means it only heats during those times (if needed). I have the temp set to 100deg (lowered it from 103).

As far a getting an absolute measurement of power used, I have a Kill-a-watt power monitor for 110v devices. Is there something similar I can get (not too expensive) to monitor/record the 220v spa usage?

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Well, I've been doing a bit of research and I've found quite a variance in estimated (and measured) power usages for hot tubs. I have seen monthly estimates varying from 100kwh (above) to 600kwh. The consensus seems to be somewhere in the middle (and a few were measured in California where I reside) at around 300kwh. For those who have low power rates (.07/kwh), this would be no big deal. But, for me, my marginal rate for electricity is .31/kwh. So, this amount of usage puts me at close to $100/month. I did see a couple of posters say that they bought temp readers and noticed that their Covermate 3 cover lifters were holding the center up slightly and preventing a good seal. I use this cover lifter and wonder if mine could be doing this.

What is the absolute minimum running time per day that a spa should have (very low usage)? It is currently set to run twice a day for 2hrs each. Heater is set to ECO which means it only heats during those times (if needed). I have the temp set to 100deg (lowered it from 103).

As far a getting an absolute measurement of power used, I have a Kill-a-watt power monitor for 110v devices. Is there something similar I can get (not too expensive) to monitor/record the 220v spa usage?

I invested in one of these a while back and have found it to be very usefull. I rent it for 25 bucks per month and will have it paid for in a year. Get the split core clips to so you can clip it on the breaker terminals.

http://www.conservationmart.com/p-713-energy-meter-reader-em-2500.aspx

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Well, I've been doing a bit of research and I've found quite a variance in estimated (and measured) power usages for hot tubs. I have seen monthly estimates varying from 100kwh (above) to 600kwh. The consensus seems to be somewhere in the middle (and a few were measured in California where I reside) at around 300kwh. For those who have low power rates (.07/kwh), this would be no big deal. But, for me, my marginal rate for electricity is .31/kwh. So, this amount of usage puts me at close to $100/month. I did see a couple of posters say that they bought temp readers and noticed that their Covermate 3 cover lifters were holding the center up slightly and preventing a good seal. I use this cover lifter and wonder if mine could be doing this.

What is the absolute minimum running time per day that a spa should have (very low usage)? It is currently set to run twice a day for 2hrs each. Heater is set to ECO which means it only heats during those times (if needed). I have the temp set to 100deg (lowered it from 103).

As far a getting an absolute measurement of power used, I have a Kill-a-watt power monitor for 110v devices. Is there something similar I can get (not too expensive) to monitor/record the 220v spa usage?

I invested in one of these a while back and have found it to be very usefull. I rent it for 25 bucks per month and will have it paid for in a year. Get the split core clips to so you can clip it on the breaker terminals.

http://www.conservationmart.com/p-713-energy-meter-reader-em-2500.aspx

Thanks for the link. This would be the definitive answer to my question of how much power is being consumed by the spa. I also have a guest house on the property on its own non-metered sub-panel. Some day I plan to rent that out and this would be a good way to meter power usage.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Well, I've been doing a bit of research and I've found quite a variance in estimated (and measured) power usages for hot tubs. I have seen monthly estimates varying from 100kwh (above) to 600kwh. The consensus seems to be somewhere in the middle (and a few were measured in California where I reside) at around 300kwh. For those who have low power rates (.07/kwh), this would be no big deal. But, for me, my marginal rate for electricity is .31/kwh. So, this amount of usage puts me at close to $100/month. I did see a couple of posters say that they bought temp readers and noticed that their Covermate 3 cover lifters were holding the center up slightly and preventing a good seal. I use this cover lifter and wonder if mine could be doing this.

What is the absolute minimum running time per day that a spa should have (very low usage)? It is currently set to run twice a day for 2hrs each. Heater is set to ECO which means it only heats during those times (if needed). I have the temp set to 100deg (lowered it from 103).

As far a getting an absolute measurement of power used, I have a Kill-a-watt power monitor for 110v devices. Is there something similar I can get (not too expensive) to monitor/record the 220v spa usage?

I am in the same boat as you.. Southern California.

My electric bill increased about $100 a month since I got the spa.

Based on some testing and calculations, my spa uses about 350 to 400 KWh per month. That puts me in tier 4, sometimes in tier 5.

The spa has two pumps, the filter cycle uses pump one with is a 3KWh pump. I am actually getting to the point of selling it and calling it a loss. Cant afford an extra $100 a month for electricity. I was told, but the sales rep, about $15 to $20 extra a month would be it. Lie about anything to get the sale...

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You have a lot of variables. one is the cost per kwh, we are loucky up here in Eastern Washington, we aew 7 cents per kwh, my D1 on average is 23.00 per month and we use it all the time.... :rolleyes:

California is a tiered systems. You are given a baseline every month. For the winter, my baseline in 315 KWh.

Tier 1 $.13/KWh (within baseline)

Tier 2 $.15/KWh (up to 30%)

Tier 3 $.24/KWh (31% to 100%)

Tier 4 $.27/KWh (101% to 200%)

Tier 5 $.31/KWh (201% and over)

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Damn! My kWh usage last December 2009 without a tub was 1915 kWh for the month for a cost of $228.00 @0.119/kWh. And that was in the winter. No wonder people in California are so hot to buy "green" things. Heck just my fridge & freezer alone would like use up 200 of that baseline of 315 kWh. Throw in the stove/oven/microwave and that usage alone would push me above the baseline. And that is without even running the electric clothes dryer.

What they expect people to do in that hi-tech state? Do they expect them to just live in the dark?

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Unfortunately that is one of the problems we have here in California, we get screwed on our energy rates, water and anything else that other States get at bargain prices. I guess after getting your monthly utility bills, you really want to relax in your spa..!

Yea but ya got all that warm weather!! Here in Northern Minnesota at .07 per KWH and 50-100 bucks a month for electricity can you imagine what we would pay in the winter for hydro. If our house was all electric which there are plenty of, we'd be well over 3-4 grand for power alone a year. Hell I pay 600 a year for propane and 720 for electric now and find as many ways as possible to lower it. 850 SF home. Water is a well so no cost except power and sewer is 3000 gallon holding tanks that have to get pumped 3-4 times a year at 120 per.

But it's damn cold!!!

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Unfortunately that is one of the problems we have here in California, we get screwed on our energy rates, water and anything else that other States get at bargain prices. I guess after getting your monthly utility bills, you really want to relax in your spa..!

Yea but ya got all that warm weather!! Here in Northern Minnesota at .07 per KWH and 50-100 bucks a month for electricity can you imagine what we would pay in the winter for hydro. If our house was all electric which there are plenty of, we'd be well over 3-4 grand for power alone a year. Hell I pay 600 a year for propane and 720 for electric now and find as many ways as possible to lower it. 850 SF home. Water is a well so no cost except power and sewer is 3000 gallon holding tanks that have to get pumped 3-4 times a year at 120 per.

But it's damn cold!!!

It would cost me over $600.00/month (probably $9,000.00/year with summer AC) just for electricity at those rates in the winter and I have oil heat which is currently about $2,200.00/year as well. My house is about 2800 sq ft including the plaster walled finished basement where my office is. I have a septic system with a leach-field system so I only empty the 1500 gal. tank every two years. I have town water which keeps rising in price each year though. I remember when I had $30.00/quarter water bills once upon a time.

They are just lucky they do not have our cold weather and those added costs long with their crazy electric rates.

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It would cost me over $600.00/month (probably $9,000.00/year with summer AC) just for electricity at those rates in the winter and I have oil heat which is currently about $2,200.00/year as well. My house is about 2800 sq ft including the plaster walled finished basement where my office is. I have a septic system with a leach-field system so I only empty the 1500 gal. tank every two years. I have town water which keeps rising in price each year though. I remember when I had $30.00/quarter water bills once upon a time.

They are just lucky they do not have our cold weather and those added costs long with their crazy electric rates.

Considering the size of your home your close to the same. A third of your current cost's. I very, very rarely use my AC. Oil heat...wow old school, my 95% effecient propane furnace is a savior and the fact that it is designed for 2000SF max means the 600 per for me is cheap heat. I heat my crawl space to prevent water line freeze and keep warm floors. Remember this was a cabin on the lake! But this spring I am reworking the attic with better venting (condensation problems) and 4-6" more insulation should reduce heating by a hund per year. But then another 400SF addition (hopefully 2011) will probably make it a wash. I have HE fridge, stove, W/D and CFL throughout to help elect. and have payed way more attention than should be allowed to phantom power.

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The Northeast uses oil heat a lot more than the rest of the country.

Don't forget to save your receipts for insulation, new doors, windows, weatherstripping, etc as this can get you a 30% energy credit on your tax return. ;)

What is an "HE" fridge, stove Washer/dryer?

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The Northeast uses oil heat a lot more than the rest of the country.

Don't forget to save your receipts for insulation, new doors, windows, weatherstripping, etc as this can get you a 30% energy credit on your tax return. ;)

What is an "HE" fridge, stove Washer/dryer?

HE= High Effeciency

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Thought so, but wasn't sure. I now have a new $1800.00 fridge I just bought that is an Energy Star model so it is supposed to save me about $100.00/yr in electricity. So if my Maytag lasts as long as my Whirlpool did it will more than pay for itself over the next 22 years. lol

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Thought so, but wasn't sure. I now have a new $1800.00 fridge I just bought that is an Energy Star model so it is supposed to save me about $100.00/yr in electricity. So if my Maytag lasts as long as my Whirlpool did it will more than pay for itself over the next 22 years. lol

In my case though it's not just slightly less power consumption on the appliances but like the washer uses half the water of a top load. And the less water the better because of the holding tanks for waste.

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