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Hot Tub Leveling Options


avoozl
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2 members have voted

  1. 1. What is the best way to level a hot tub on a sloping concrete pad?

    • Rip Pressure Treated 2x4s and place them every foot
      0
    • Build a slab platform with pressure treated 2x4s with pressure treated plywood on top
      0
    • The Spa Level-R
      0
    • Wooden box + Sand or Pea Gravel + Handi Pads
      0
    • Wooden box + Sand or Pea Gravel + EZ Pads
      1
    • Pour another layer of concrete on top of my current one
      0
    • Other
      1


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I have a concrete slab for a patio. It is pretty good size at 16 x 20 feet, and it is about 12" thick. It is a good slab and is the perfect place to put a spa. But when the prior owner of the home had the slab poured, he had the concrete contractors put in a nice slope for drainage purposes. The slab is a compound slope, with a v-shape, draining towards the middle, and I will have to span the low part with the hot tub.

spaground.jpg

(Slope exaggerated in diagram to leave room for text.)

I have been doing a lot of research on this topic, and here are the options I have found:

Shim it or build a platform

The Spa Level-R

Handi Spa Pads

EZ Pads

What would you do in this situation? The easiest solution seems to be to build a slab platform, but I live in Portland, OR with plenty of rain, and I really don't want to have to worry about rot.

The Spa Level-R looks pretty slick, but it's very expensive and also made out of wood.

The pads look OK, but I don't think their intended purpose is for placement on top of sloping concrete.

What would you do? Any options I have missed? Any advice is greatly appreciated.

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avoozi,

I have considerably carpentry experience so, if I were in your situation, my first thought would be to build my own custom-made leveling "shims" out of treated 2" x 4"s. I would measure and shape them accordingly to create the level surface you are looking for. I would double them up, i.e., side by side, every 12" on center for the width/length of your tub. I would also router or drill spaced drainage slots along the across bottom of doubled-up 2" x 4"s to shims to allow any water to run through and not gather under the tub.

However, you never mentioned whether your patio is sealed or painted to prevent the concrete from holding moisture. If the patio is not sealed, then I would be reluctant to put any shims under the tub. Even with drainage slots, the concrete will retain water and the shims will eventually rot. If your patio is not sealed or painted to keep water out, then I would probably go with the Spa leveler. This would keep your tub off the concrete slab and water and drainage will not be an issue.

gman

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avoozi,

I have considerably carpentry experience so, if I were in your situation, my first thought would be to build my own custom-made leveling "shims" out of treated 2" x 4"s. I would measure and shape them accordingly to create the level surface you are looking for. I would double them up, i.e., side by side, every 12" on center for the width/length of your tub. I would also router or drill spaced drainage slots along the across bottom of doubled-up 2" x 4"s to shims to allow any water to run through and not gather under the tub.

However, you never mentioned whether your patio is sealed or painted to prevent the concrete from holding moisture. If the patio is not sealed, then I would be reluctant to put any shims under the tub. Even with drainage slots, the concrete will retain water and the shims will eventually rot. If your patio is not sealed or painted to keep water out, then I would probably go with the Spa leveler. This would keep your tub off the concrete slab and water and drainage will not be an issue.

gman

My patio is about 4 years old, and it is sealed, so that is not a problem. I have moderate carpentry experience, and I would be able to build my own custom-made leveling "shims" without great difficulty. I like the idea of drilling drainage slots in the wood to prevent water from pooling under the tub.

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I would build a box/frame out of PT 2x4s (or 2x6s) painted black and rip the bottom to match the contour of the slope. I would then fill that box with pea gravel (about 1" below the top of the frame, set the spa on that and call it a day).

This sounds like the type of box I would have to use for either of the Spa Pad options. If I were to build a Box and put in pea gravel, is there any benefit of adding the spa pads?

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I would build a box/frame out of PT 2x4s (or 2x6s) painted black and rip the bottom to match the contour of the slope. I would then fill that box with pea gravel (about 1" below the top of the frame, set the spa on that and call it a day).

This sounds like the type of box I would have to use for either of the Spa Pad options. If I were to build a Box and put in pea gravel, is there any benefit of adding the spa pads?

I've seen many applications where the spa is put directly on the pea gravel without a pad in between.

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