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220v Vs 110v On The Pump

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I'm starting to setup my new Pentair pump/filter and I can go 110 or 220.

What's the difference? (besides the wires & voltage)

Is one any better than the other?

Thanks,

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I'm starting to setup my new Pentair pump/filter and I can go 110 or 220.

What's the difference? (besides the wires & voltage)

Is one any better than the other?

Thanks,

Lets see, if a pump is 110v and running at about 16 amps, you will be burning 1760 Watts an hour.. So here in New hampshire that would be about 18 cents an hour and if run for 8 hours a day it would cost $1.44 a day and about $43.00 month.

Now if it is 220 volts, it usually runs about half the amps, Motor runs cooler, and last longer. BUT lets do the math here..

220 Volts @ 8 amps = 1760 Watts. Each leg is drawning 880 watts times 2 legs = 1760 watts..

Now motor will last longer than a 110 volt motor because it wont work as hard.

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I'm starting to setup my new Pentair pump/filter and I can go 110 or 220.

What's the difference? (besides the wires & voltage)

Is one any better than the other?

Thanks,

Using 220 volts runs the pump at lower amps which means lower operating costs. Will say a 1 hp pump running on 115 volts pulls 15 amps. The higher the amps the more electric it uses. the same pump at 220 volts pulls 7.5 amps. the lower amps will reduce heat because it is not pulling the high amp load. The 7.5 does not get added together. It is 7.5 or 15 total. That is why Dryers and ovens are 220 volts to lower the amp load to make them cheaper to run.

Here is a common electrical saying. the higher the voltage the lower the amps, cheaper to run.

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I'm starting to setup my new Pentair pump/filter and I can go 110 or 220.

What's the difference? (besides the wires & voltage)

Is one any better than the other?

Thanks,

Using 220 volts runs the pump at lower amps which means lower operating costs. Will say a 1 hp pump running on 115 volts pulls 15 amps. The higher the amps the more electric it uses. the same pump at 220 volts pulls 7.5 amps. the lower amps will reduce heat because it is not pulling the high amp load. The 7.5 does not get added together. It is 7.5 or 15 total. That is why Dryers and ovens are 220 volts to lower the amp load to make them cheaper to run.

Here is a common electrical saying. the higher the voltage the lower the amps, cheaper to run.

Im sorry but your wrong. They run at half the power PER LEG so total combined its the same.. A 110volt Pump running at 15 amps consumes the same as a 220 Volt running at 7.5 amps. Remember to add for both legs.. One leg is running at 7.5 amps and the other is running at 7.5 amps, so each leg is consuming 825 watts for a total of 1650 watts just like a single 110 volt running at 15 amps that is also consuming 1650 watts.

I have explained this 1000's of times to customers and to pool places that tell customers that its cheaper to run. Its cheaper to install, Pumps last longer BUT not cheaper to run.

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I'm starting to setup my new Pentair pump/filter and I can go 110 or 220.

What's the difference? (besides the wires & voltage)

Is one any better than the other?

Thanks,

Using 220 volts runs the pump at lower amps which means lower operating costs. Will say a 1 hp pump running on 115 volts pulls 15 amps. The higher the amps the more electric it uses. the same pump at 220 volts pulls 7.5 amps. the lower amps will reduce heat because it is not pulling the high amp load. The 7.5 does not get added together. It is 7.5 or 15 total. That is why Dryers and ovens are 220 volts to lower the amp load to make them cheaper to run.

Here is a common electrical saying. the higher the voltage the lower the amps, cheaper to run.

Im sorry but your wrong. They run at half the power PER LEG so total combined its the same.. A 110volt Pump running at 15 amps consumes the same as a 220 Volt running at 7.5 amps. Remember to add for both legs.. One leg is running at 7.5 amps and the other is running at 7.5 amps, so each leg is consuming 825 watts for a total of 1650 watts just like a single 110 volt running at 15 amps that is also consuming 1650 watts.

I have explained this 1000's of times to customers and to pool places that tell customers that its cheaper to run. Its cheaper to install, Pumps last longer BUT not cheaper to run.

You are wrong. The motor nameplate states the volts and amps. If you added the amps together only one amp rating would be on the motor not two.

here is a explanation from somebody else

http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qi...30234649AAcV8ho

he says the same thing I do, A motor will run cost less to operate on higher voltage because it will lower the amps and thus reduces watts, which is how you get billed by the electric company. Why do think factories uses 480 volts to reduce operating costs to run the big machines.

That is also why at higher voltage and lower amps you can use smaller wire because it is drawing less power to do the same job compared to 110 volts with a higher amps and larger wire.

I am not trying to be mean or anything, but a call a electrical contractor and ask them or any place that sells motors. I have worked in the electric field I know I am right

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Sorry again.. But have you read what you have posted for a link..

This is what your link stated

"Higher voltages are used just to provide the same amount of power but use less current. You use less current you get less voltage drop across a line and are able to use smaller cheaper conductors."

Like you said read the nameplate.. a 220 volt will run at 7.5 amps PER LEG.. In a 220 Volts system there is 2 legs so you must add those together. Yes, the conductors will be smaller, yes the Breaker will be smaller in size but the total WATTAGE will be EXACTLY THE SAME .. What part of that dont u understand.. Just like your link provided.. SAME AMOUNT OF POWER BUT LESS CURRENT.. Current is amps.. Power is Wattage and your using the same amout of power..

I also am not trying to be mean, but i have been an Electrical Contractor for over 15 years and been as an electrician for over 25 years. Worked at every aspect of the industry from Wiring malls, to doing take off for Airports (not actually taking off but Take off for load calculations), and you dont think i know what im talking about.. LOL..

One more thing.. Lets use the old PIE formula.. P = Power (Watts) I = Amps and E = Voltage

P

-------------------

I | E

Now the nameplate of a motor states it runs both 110/220 Volts and amps at 15/7.5 amps

P = Amps X Volts So a motor that is 110 volts and drawing 15 amps = 15 (amps) x 110(volts) = 1650 Watts.

P = Amps X Volts So a motor that is 220 volts and drawing 7.5 amps = 7.5 (amps) x 220(Volts = 1650 Watts.

Any Questions??

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Sorry again.. But have you read what you have posted for a link..

This is what your link stated

"Higher voltages are used just to provide the same amount of power but use less current. You use less current you get less voltage drop across a line and are able to use smaller cheaper conductors."

Like you said read the nameplate.. a 220 volt will run at 7.5 amps PER LEG.. In a 220 Volts system there is 2 legs so you must add those together. Yes, the conductors will be smaller, yes the Breaker will be smaller in size but the total WATTAGE will be EXACTLY THE SAME .. What part of that dont u understand.. Just like your link provided.. SAME AMOUNT OF POWER BUT LESS CURRENT.. Current is amps.. Power is Wattage and your using the same amout of power..

I also am not trying to be mean, but i have been an Electrical Contractor for over 15 years and been as an electrician for over 25 years. Worked at every aspect of the industry from Wiring malls, to doing take off for Airports (not actually taking off but Take off for load calculations), and you dont think i know what im talking about.. LOL..

One more thing.. Lets use the old PIE formula.. P = Power (Watts) I = Amps and E = Voltage

P

-------------------

I | E

Now the nameplate of a motor states it runs both 110/220 Volts and amps at 15/7.5 amps

P = Amps X Volts So a motor that is 110 volts and drawing 15 amps = 15 (amps) x 110(volts) = 1650 Watts.

P = Amps X Volts So a motor that is 220 volts and drawing 7.5 amps = 7.5 (amps) x 220(Volts = 1650 Watts.

Any Questions??

Just to clear this up for everyone who is reading this. I dug around for my old books and as Sparkmaster claims He is correct on energy consuption. the wattage is the same and will cost the same amount to run the pump. I was in error and I apologize to all

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Just to clear this up for everyone who is reading this. I dug around for my old books and as Sparkmaster claims He is correct on energy consuption. the wattage is the same and will cost the same amount to run the pump. I was in error and I apologize to all

Hey we all make mistakes and we learn by them right?? I am wrong 90% of the time B) but I learn from them..

Anyways I got to add another comment about using 220v pumps/motors. The link that you previously mentioned was using 220V for the purpose of a cheaper installation because conductor size and so on and so on.. This does not hold true for Pool installations. Pool codes state that a dedicated 20 amp circuit must be supplied for Pool pumps. So conductor size wont save you money BUT the breaker that you have to purchase will bust your wallet.. A typical 20 amp GFCI single pole breaker runs about 30 bucks while a 2-pole 20 amp GFCI Breaker will run anywhere past the $80.00 bracket.. I purchase a 20 amp today and had a heart attack.. Thank god i pass it along to the customer and than some..

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I have been running my pool motor pump on 220V  with the internal switch set to the 230 setting(i.e. toggle switch for 110/230) on the motor for ever.

Recently, i had some issues with the wiring and on/off switch for the pump motor, and had an electrician replace the on/off switch and replace the circuit breaker (2 pole 20 amp).

But, coincidentally, when we started the motor back up the thermal protector in the motor stopped the motor after running for about 3-4 minutes on the 220V setting. The motor is about 8 years old. But when I changed the setting on the motor to 110v , and then plugged the motor to a 110 source the motor ran without shutting off. 

My question is, is it possible for the motor to go bad on the 220v setting, and but seemingly be OK on the 110V?  Or is the motor gone bad and I need to replace it and go back to the 220v?

Can the motor be tested for problems in the 220v setting? Or does it speak to itself, that it shuts off on 220, but not 110? Therefore, can something be repaired to get the 220v running again without shutting off?

Thanks

 

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I am also looking for the right answer to what I thought would be a simple question. Which motor would be more efficient to use for our pool filter? While it is true that if you multiply the voltage and current of the same motor running 110v or 220v, you will arrive at the same power (watts). In reality, doesn't the 220 motor will run cooler because is is using less current. What about the voltage drop across the power line from the panel. Higher current means higher drop. With the motor running, if the voltage gets dropped 5 or 10 volts does the motor draw more current than if at 115v or is the efficiency decreased? The motor can't slow down; it must keep up with the 60 cycle line frequency. If the motor is running for hours in the hot sun, will that higher temperature make the motor run hotter, causing the resistance of the conductors to increase? Would that heat result in power losses?  It seems intuitive that a cooler running motor is more efficient.

Also, it would seem more preferable for the current load to be cut in half and distributed between both legs, as opposed to being doubled up on one leg.

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Well... you're theoretically correct for the most part, but I think you're overthinking it. You're mostly talking about some pretty small variables that won't amount to any significant $ on your electric bill.

I prefer to use 230v pumps when possible. The lower current allows me to use smaller wire and breaker for the same hp in some cases, and I prefer not to push the limits of a circuit in any case.

Motors are rated at +/- 10% usually, and at 115v and 230v. This makes the voltage range more than sufficient to accommodate any voltage drop you may have. To drop anything significant would take a VERY long run of wire. I would upsize the wire if voltage drop were sufficient to be concerning.

Running for hours in the hot sun could cause some issues with thermal cutout at any voltage. The motor has an internal heat switch that turns it off if it gets too hot. I would recommend something, perhaps a wood fence enclosure, to provide some shade to all of your equipment, especially any electronic controls or devices. 

 

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