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Found 10 results

  1. Hot tub just delivered. All ok so far and I figured out how to remove the Service Panel but there's insulation there - a board of insulation. How to remove that insulation without tearing it up? The insulation is an (apparently) removable 1" or so thick board of solid insulation with a foil outer shell and yellow internal substance. Thanks in advance..I checked the manual (nothing of course), checked videos and the Strong site...nothing.
  2. Dear masters of the spa, I have spent days reading the threads here and thank you everyone I have learned loads. I Have owned my spaform 4000 for 12 years here in rainy old England. it has 6 seats and a bubble bed, large twin filters, 1 x twin speed pump, 1xhigh speed pump, a light, a non functioning blower (dead blower I think). Pipes are clean, pumps and seals are new etc etc. You can fit 8 people in it comfortably and It works perfectly but is now being used by paying guests staying at the house it's at. When guests stay for more than one night the problem arises, no one is able to go there and check the tub and chlorinate etc. Generally, most bookings involve 5-8 guests getting in drunk and dirty for a couple of hours, they crank the temperature right up and spill booze amd smoke in it and generally have a bloody good time. Fair enough. However, after the end of a stay it's sometimes inevitably a foul smelling green or cloudy beer pond. Before each lot of guests arrive, we get the ph neutral, filters clean and chlorine to 7ppm. We add 1 x small chlorine tablet directly to the skimmer weir trap above the filters. This has usually disolved by the 2nd night. I Keep the filters changed every week and clean up any problems after each booking but with a 4 hour changeover time between guests there will be a day when the tub isn't ready or cold for the next guests. This can not happen! Plus I don't want the chlorine dropping to zero like that. I used to use Aquaguarde (think this then became aquafinesse) in the past and I don't mind doing it again if that is the best solution. So I have some questions... 1. How can I get the guests to add chlorine shock without having them handle any chemicals or do any testing. 2. Can I remotely maintain it via some cool internet based system? 3. Is aquafinesse with 2 slow release chlorine tablet dispensers the answer? I don't think 1 dispenser will cut it. Bather load is usually high. Up to 8 people for maybe 2-3 hours. It's currently sanitised with stabilised chlorine granules, mixed up in a jug with water then poured in slowly into the jetstream. It has an O3 generator too. Money is the lowest concern, I have to protect my holiday home business from a bad hot tub situation and the guests can not be exposed to dangerous chemicals at all or be involved in maintenance. Has anyone got any cool ideas? Thank you very much for reading this, you lovely clever people.
  3. Pool owner or someone considering installing a pool - My advice from a proven quality contractor of several decades is to do your due diligence before going into a pool store. I've read forum after forums, honestly most on those forums are not professionals when it comes to "correct" advice. An example I've read many articles where ones write about prices to upkeep pool's in general. That is like comparing nutritional value and price to nectarines v. peaches. Neither are even germane to each other. Prices in the United States are divided into Climate Zones, time for swim season in Southern California isn't going be the same in San Francisco or even Atlanta Georgia, and the prices will vary from geographical area to the next mainly based on Basic Economics. Yea the course most fail the first time out. Prices vary all over the board are due to supply and demand, if the demand for chlorine is high in the peak Summer months as compared to Winter months elsewhere because you cannot or if had any sense at all know that Chlorine will lose its potency as it ages, similar to males. Thy chances of fathering children at age 50 is far less than at age 20's because of one word ones who own swimming pools seem to forget as compared to a spa, whirlpool, or even hot tub. That word is "Potency." That is why I warn others to ask for the manufacturing date before buying pool store liquid chlorine; so what, it's 12% when manufactured, but if the distributor did not deliver until 14 days later, and the pool store did not sell until 10 days later now you have a product that is 26 days aged. That now 12% chlorine is not 12% but more likely 8.28% germane to grocery store brand at far less price. If that same 12% was left in the sunlight then it will be even less potent than 8.28%, more likely closer to 7.09%; but, that all depends upon geographical region of the Climate Zone again. Why pay almost $5.00 a gallon when you can buy germane product for $2.35 a gallon that serves the same principle. Another word of caution that pool stores do not warn ones of; and, I am not surprised there not more law offices located near pool stores that specialize in personal injury law. Combining different types of chlorine is very dangerous, you are asking for dangerous ways to harm yourself badly! Storing chlorine in the same building as you store your garden supplies like gasoline, motor oil and BBQ supplies - Well folks I'm surprised you have not blown up the neighborhood. One teaspoon of motor-oil added to one teaspoon of chlorine will relocate your house, yourself, and objects around you over into the next county, with you unlikely surviving the explosion. That equates to one stick of dynamite or about one Joule of energy. Image a dump truck loaded with sand that's about 38 tons. A stick of dynamite will send that truck 60 mph in an upward motion without any assistance; sixty miles per hour upwards. What do you think that will do to you or your house. Don't Mess With Chlorine, and sadly enough pool stores do not warn ones of the dangers of mixing and handling products sold. A struggle attorney could retire young by placing an office near the largest pool store in the community quickly at the rate of misleading information coming from pool stores. Most pool stores hire college age who have very little experience with chemicals or pools; so, go figure next time you go into a pool store. The Internet is filled with information if you know where to look all about chemicals used in water balancing. Did you know that vinyl liner pools do not required the value of Calcium Hardness that so many pool stores sell ones upon. Find a basic chemistry book from a high school, and find the periodic table and learn it; and, you will say yourself piles of cash by staying away from pool stores. You don't need their advice or supplies to save piles of cash, and enjoy your investment. I've ran into hundreds of frustrated people who've been mislead by pool stores; so, frustrated they were in tears due to pool stores robbing them because a store cannot survive without customers. I actually felt so badly about an elderly lady who had spent over a thousand dollars at a local pool store who mislead her in how to get their pool blue again, and I fixed her problem at no charge for labor for less than $5.00 from the pantry of her kitchen. That's just one sad story about my take on pool stores, they're not professionals in the trade they represent for the majority. Give example that same pool store installed a swimming pool at a house I'd purchased many years ago, and they used "staples"; yes, you read that correctly "staples" to hold the wall foam in places rather than spend the money for proper spray adhesive. Those staples is later learned is what caused a high metal content in the pool costing me over a $1,300 to exchange at my labor costs because most whom claim to be professionals in this case are nuts; and, worst part many pool owners are squirrels chasing after those nuts...
  4. We live in NW Washington state and have a 20+ year old Discovery spa. We're planning to be away for three weeks this winter and are wondering what we should do to "park" the spa while we're gone. Nighttime temps here frequently drop below freezing, occasionally into teens or single digits (though that seems less likely this winter with El Niño weather pattern). Short duration power outages (usually less than one day) aren't uncommon. When power comes back on, tub automatically resets to 100 F. I'm thinking that just before we go I should just shock it, raise the total bromine level to 20 ppm or so, leave the bromine dispenser float full, set the temp at 90 F, and hope for the best. Is that a reasonable approach? I'd be interested in learning what others do in this situation.
  5. Hello Experts, We signed a contract to buy a foreclosed house with 500 sq ft gunite pool (will be moving in Jan). We have two very young children (new born and 1.5 year old). Older one takes a swimming classes. Pool was not maintained by the previous owners (last time neighbors see anyone using it, was couple of years ago), it is filled with water and covered but when I looked under the cover I couldn't see anything, so I guess algae/mold must have covered everything. With young children in mind I don't think I can open pool for next few years (there was a death in family due to swimming accident so wife understandably won't let me open the pool, until children can acquire swimming/pool survival skills, which could be as far as 3-5 years away). Also, backyard is not very big and pool takes significant space. I asked few pool service companies to access condition of the pool, but without full access to the property, their guess is to resurface/replaster and change all equipments (pumps, filters, heating system) and if it wasn't winterize then may need to change plumbing (i'm in PA winter could be harsh) - their guess based on the fact pool hasn't opened in last few years. Estimate runs from 10k - 20k - depending on the pool company. Pool itself and surrounding landscape is really very well done, I wouldn't be able to afford it myself, if I got house without the pool (estimate to add pool runs around 50-70k). My wife is thinking about just getting rid of the pool, but I feel its really a waste to take down such a beautiful structure. I was considering following few options - but nothing seems workable for me and I never had a pool so don't know anything about it. Pool service companies I contacted - really didn't help me either (they are mostly interested in maintenance contracts): Options: 1. Is its possible to leave pool covered for that long time - may be possibly 3-5 years? I called few pool service companies - they said, I should keep the pool water at half depth and they will come in the beginning of the year and will add some chemicals which will reduce growth of algae/mold etc. I need to keep the pool covered and add water/chemicals if it goes below half mark. I don't know if this a workable solution, I'm worried it will turn into stinky swamp. Plus kids can't use the backyard as well. 2. Some people on web are talking about doing a deckover (some company in Arizona does that). But it requires draining the pool and I don't know - if it would work in my area (king of prussia, PA) - as we are getting significant rain and I think pool would float. I don't know if it will work, if we put few holes in the bottom of the pool to release hydro-static pressure (and sump pump) and then build deck - i also don't know putting holes in bottom of the pool will destroys the pool for good or could be fixed in future, to use it. None of the company in my area heard of deckover - so may be I need to find some contractor to do it (if it is remotely possible). 3. Putting some kind of permanent cover - which seals the pool and its walkable - i didn't find any thing on this. 4. Fill in the pool (demolition) - I really hate this option, but nothing seems workable for my situation. Cost in my area runs around 7k-12k. Please advice me, if anything else is possible in this situation. I don't know if this a right forum to put this kind of question, if this is a incorrect place I'm apologizing and please point me in right direction. Thanks in advance and sorry for such long windy questions.
  6. Getting my new tub started up. I have owned a hot tub for about 20 years. Old one finally bit the dust. The new tub (from Watkins) calls for using granular Sodium Dichlor. It says NOT to use Sodium Dichlor tablets. Well, I had been using bromine tablets for years. When I asked the company about this, their answer was, "Granular form of bromine is fine but we do not recommend using tablets and floaters in any form. These tablets are very concentrated and will damage your jet pump, heater and jets causing them to fail much sooner than they should from over-sanitizing the water. Is this true? Indicative of "sensitive components"? Or not trusting the owner to NOT over-sanitize? I guess I could learn "new tricks", but wondered whether the "old tricks" (bromine tablets with some shock) are out of date.
  7. Hello. My name is Erik Martin and I'm working on a new story for The Costco Connection (the consumer magazine for members of Costco stores) on the following topic: DIVING IN (WITHOUT TAKING A BATH): How to save money on maintaining and closing your pool this season: tips on the best supplies to switch to, routine care and upkeep practices that can prevent costly repairs, and why pool owners should learn to close a pool themselves, and how to do it, to save hundreds of dollars a year. For this story, I’m looking to interview homeowners who own and maintain their own pools. I can either conduct a phone or email interview (with the latter, you can type up responses to my questions below and email them to me if you prefer). My deadline to complete all interviews is Thursday, April 4 at 4 p.m. central time. Please contact me via this forum or at martinspiration@gmail.com to arrange an interview. To check my credentials, feel free to visit www.martinspiration.blogspot.com. QUESTIONS: Why should owners learn to do it themselves? What are the benefits to opening/closing/maintaining your own pool? In addition to saving money, are there any other advantages? What will owners need to learn, purchase and do to be able to open their own pool at the start of next season? What’s the best way to learn the proper techniques for opening/closing: hire a pro one time who can train you? Read a book? Surf the Internet/YouTube? What will owners need to learn, purchase and do to be able to close their own pool (e.g., air compressor, antifreeze, winter cover, etc.)? How much will these items cost? How much money can homeowners save a year by handling pool maintenance duties themselves (opening/closing/cleaning/maintaining) instead of hiring a professional service? Give an estimate for an average in-ground and an average above-ground pool. What are at least some of these duties that any homeowner can and should learn to do themselves? Why? Do you have any tips on the best way to save money on regular supplies (chlorinator, shock, algaecide, etc.) without sacrificing quality? Is it best to buy in large bulk quantities? Are tablets more economical than granulated chlorine? Does brand not really matter when it comes to supplies? What does matter? What are the preferred ingredients and minimum available chlorine you recommend in these supplies, so that owners know what to look for? Are there any circumstances/situations where owners should be prepared to enlist a professional for help? What is the key to having a clean, well-maintained and properly functioning pool all season long if you’re doing to do it yourself? Any other tips here? What are some good preventive maintenance recommendations you can offer pool owners so they can avoid costly repairs and ensure a long lifespan for their equipment? If you’re a pool owner, how long have you owned your pool? What kind is it (inground/above ground; what kind of liner, filter, pump/motor; dimensions/volume; etc.)? Do you hire a service (for what? How much does it cost?) or do you do it yourself (for how long? Why do you do it yourself?)? Why should pool owners consider doing their own maintenance/upkeep in your opinion? Are you a Costco member (if so, for how long?) What is your full name? What city/state do you live in? If you’re a pool maintenance professional, what are the pros/cons of pool owners performing their own maintenance? Do you recommend it in any way? Why/why not? What should owners except if they attempt to do it themselves? What are some other ways they can save money on their pool during the season—any tips? Are you a Costco member (if so, how long)? What is your full name? What city/state is your business in, and what is the full name of your business? Any other thoughts, comments, or tips you wanted to offer on this topic? Sincerely, Erik J. Martin martinspiration@gmail.com
  8. Hey everyone, So I've been doing a good deal of research on a new spa purchase. I know I want a larger tub, that is preferably deeper(I'm a larger fella, tall and heavy, but not huge). A big plus for me in a tub is easy maintenance, with lower to no odor, and minimal skin irritation. I'd like something my girlfriend and myself can stretch out in, but also that will accommodate several people for when we have parties. I intend to build a Sauna in close-ish vicinity to the tub, not that this is all that relevant, but I'm assuming you guys and gals have more experience with this, so who knows, perhaps it's a point to be made. Anyhow, build quality and energy consumption are huge selling points for me, as I'd like a tub that is low maintenance, durable in southern Michigan winters, won't cost me a ton to maintain in both price and time, and will cause me less hassle in the long run. I know that a good relationship with a dealer is extremely important, so that aside, assuming they all give equal service, what are your thought on Models, and brands I should be looking at, methods for getting the best price, and filtration and sanitization methods and add-ons for these models, to make maintenance as easy and cost effective as possible. Also, are there any brands that simply just blow the competition out of the water in terms of any of these specifics? Thanks for your input, and try not to make this a soap box for disdain.
  9. We have a 3 month old Jacuzzi 345. Just did first water change. After draining, there was still quite a bit of water in the foot well that was below the drain intake. We had to bail the residual out, then after cleaning the inside with vinegar, we hosed it down and had to bail it out again. It was a time consuming and messy process that we are not looking forward to when it is below freezing out and have to stand in the water (we live in MA). There must be a better way to get the residual out...any suggestions on a small submersible pump or other tips to speed up the process? Thanks!
  10. Has anyone used or heard of anyone who has been using the Freshrain product? It seems to good to be true but if it works as advertised...
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