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Found 5 results

  1. Im trying to settle and argument between my father in law and I. The previous owners left a fairly new "used" 6 person in-ground hot tub uninstalled near the pool. I wanted to get rid of it but my father in law thinks that we can just build an above ground "shell" for it and incorporate the piping into the in-ground pool system. Im fairly certain this CANT be done. I once read that there was a difference in how the in and above ground hot tubs were made. Am I correct? Is it possible to build an above ground frame to house it? Or can In-ground hot tubs ONLY be installed in-ground for water displacement reasons? Please educate us! Thanks in advance!
  2. Hello Everyone. Reaching out here, in the hope of some of your wisdom and help pls. Guess what i did ? Yup. chlorine capsule escaped to the bottom of the above ground (bestway) pool. i didn't see it until the following morning. By then, the chlorine had burnt through (dissolved) top layer of the pvc liner. through to the mesh layer. i did panic, but actually it didn't see to be leaking much water since water pressure seemed to seal the other pvc layer, to the floor (ground). the affected area is about the size of my hand. i tried putting on those pvc repair patches. but they float off within an hour. water pressure when the pool is full seems to prevent much water leaking. but i really want to patch / cover up the area where the pvc top layer has dissolved. or to buy a large (1 foot square patch) and attach that. does anyone have any tips or suggestions ? ideally if i could just get a strong glue / adhesive to cover the abraissed area (when the pool is empty) then maybe ? i thought of even a strong silicon that you put around the bathrooms seals? but kids jump in the pool and so there feet i would assume would wear away the silicon. is there like a paint glue i cant jut put over the affected area, to give it a rubber seal ? (i'm intending on lifting up the pool, and putting another layer of plastic sheeting underneath so that water pressure again forces the pool liner into direct contact with a plastic flooring, prior to the ground. very much appreciate any thoughts. (i'm in south italy, and so dint have the abundance of DIY stores i'm sure you luck people have elsewhere) jez
  3. Hi everyone. We bought a house that came with an AG 15,000 gallon pool almost 3 years ago. When we got it, we finished up the season knowing nothing but were given simple instructions and we managed fine and we closed it up fine. Last year, we opened it fine, chemicals were good for a month-ish and the pool looked inviting. Last year was a terrible year for our family, my husband lost his sister as well as he was diagnosed with cancer. The pool took a back burner. Between our normal jobs and appointments and you name it...it developed algae due to us #1)not knowing what we were doing #2)trusting the pool companies #3)not having time to commit to it. We unfortunately relied on the pool companies and all they did was have us spend a ton of money on things that didn't 100% work. We ended up closing the pool early (yes it was still a mess). When it came time to open it this year, we paid a company a come out and install a new sand filter (we previously had an old cartridge filter) and open the pool and get the chemicals off on the right foot for us. I can't say we were completely pleased, when he opened the pool, he dumped everything that was on the cover of the pool into the pool! That was nasty sitting water/leaves/etc that had been accumulating for over 6 months! By the time he was "done", the water was almost clear, it was a pretty blue, and you could see piles of debris sitting in the bottom, which he told us to use our Polaris to get out or scoop it out. As soon as we started this project, everything got stirred up. We've vacuumed the pool, used the Polaris, scooped out as much as we can...and we have this cloudy aquamarine/teal color and you can't see the bottom. I tested the pool about an hour ago and here were the results, we use a Taylor K2006 kit to do it ourselves since we found we got different results when we took the same pool sample to 3 different pool companies. FC: 2.8ppm CC: 1.2ppm Ph: 7.2 TA: 70ppm CH: 170ppm CYA: 60ppm We just received this test kit at the beginning of the month and we've been able to successfully raise and lower results as needed thanks to the treatment guide provided with the kit. This result was the highest the CC has been since we started testing. TA, CH, and CYA have been very stable since we originally got them corrected. The only things we're closely monitoring and adding are chlorine and soda ash as needed. The big question is how to be get our pool sparkling blue?
  4. Hello. My name is Erik Martin and I'm working on a new story for The Costco Connection (the consumer magazine for members of Costco stores) on the following topic: DIVING IN (WITHOUT TAKING A BATH): How to save money on maintaining and closing your pool this season: tips on the best supplies to switch to, routine care and upkeep practices that can prevent costly repairs, and why pool owners should learn to close a pool themselves, and how to do it, to save hundreds of dollars a year. For this story, I’m looking to interview homeowners who own and maintain their own pools. I can either conduct a phone or email interview (with the latter, you can type up responses to my questions below and email them to me if you prefer). My deadline to complete all interviews is Thursday, April 4 at 4 p.m. central time. Please contact me via this forum or at martinspiration@gmail.com to arrange an interview. To check my credentials, feel free to visit www.martinspiration.blogspot.com. QUESTIONS: Why should owners learn to do it themselves? What are the benefits to opening/closing/maintaining your own pool? In addition to saving money, are there any other advantages? What will owners need to learn, purchase and do to be able to open their own pool at the start of next season? What’s the best way to learn the proper techniques for opening/closing: hire a pro one time who can train you? Read a book? Surf the Internet/YouTube? What will owners need to learn, purchase and do to be able to close their own pool (e.g., air compressor, antifreeze, winter cover, etc.)? How much will these items cost? How much money can homeowners save a year by handling pool maintenance duties themselves (opening/closing/cleaning/maintaining) instead of hiring a professional service? Give an estimate for an average in-ground and an average above-ground pool. What are at least some of these duties that any homeowner can and should learn to do themselves? Why? Do you have any tips on the best way to save money on regular supplies (chlorinator, shock, algaecide, etc.) without sacrificing quality? Is it best to buy in large bulk quantities? Are tablets more economical than granulated chlorine? Does brand not really matter when it comes to supplies? What does matter? What are the preferred ingredients and minimum available chlorine you recommend in these supplies, so that owners know what to look for? Are there any circumstances/situations where owners should be prepared to enlist a professional for help? What is the key to having a clean, well-maintained and properly functioning pool all season long if you’re doing to do it yourself? Any other tips here? What are some good preventive maintenance recommendations you can offer pool owners so they can avoid costly repairs and ensure a long lifespan for their equipment? If you’re a pool owner, how long have you owned your pool? What kind is it (inground/above ground; what kind of liner, filter, pump/motor; dimensions/volume; etc.)? Do you hire a service (for what? How much does it cost?) or do you do it yourself (for how long? Why do you do it yourself?)? Why should pool owners consider doing their own maintenance/upkeep in your opinion? Are you a Costco member (if so, for how long?) What is your full name? What city/state do you live in? If you’re a pool maintenance professional, what are the pros/cons of pool owners performing their own maintenance? Do you recommend it in any way? Why/why not? What should owners except if they attempt to do it themselves? What are some other ways they can save money on their pool during the season—any tips? Are you a Costco member (if so, how long)? What is your full name? What city/state is your business in, and what is the full name of your business? Any other thoughts, comments, or tips you wanted to offer on this topic? Sincerely, Erik J. Martin martinspiration@gmail.com
  5. We are excited to be launching a brand new 19ft Swimming Spa http://swimspasplus.com/celestina-swimming-pool-spa/ check it out let us know what you think! And it is great to be on Pool/Spa Forum this is our first post!
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