What Would Happen If I Used Vinegar To Lower Ph? - Swimming Pool Water Chemistry - Pool and Spa Forum

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What Would Happen If I Used Vinegar To Lower Ph?


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#1 ClearWater

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Posted 30 July 2007 - 09:32 PM

My pH is around 8 and I am battling algae. So far the water isn't slimy, but it is looking rather green-gray. I have dry acid but I hate to use it. I was trying to think about what else could lower the pH and my husband suggested white vinegar.

We have an Intex 16'x4' agp. I have been shocking with bleach and using the cheesy garden-hose vaccuum to try to get up what is on the bottom of the pool. (I ordered the filter vac but it hasn't come yet...).

What do you think would happen if I did use white vinegar to lower the pH?


Thanks for considering the question.

Tracy

#2 waterbear

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Posted 30 July 2007 - 10:09 PM

vinegar is what is known chemically as a 'weak' acid'. It is actually a 5% solution of acetic acid so it is really very dilute. It will add acetates to the water and create a secondary buffer system in the water that would not be desirable. Dry acid (sodium bisulfate) forms sulfuric acid when dissolved in water and that is chemically a 'strong acid' . If you don't like using it there is always muriatic acid which is, IMHO, a better choice.
Save the vinegar for making pickles!
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#3 ClearWater

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Posted 31 July 2007 - 12:44 PM

Thanks for the thoughts. Since I have dry acid, I guess I'll use it.

I raised the chlorine to about 12 ppm last night and at noon today the reading was .5. Is that normal?

Tracy
QUOTE(waterbear @ Jul 30 2007, 11:09 PM) View Post
vinegar is what is known chemically as a 'weak' acid'. It is actually a 5% solution of acetic acid so it is really very dilute. It will add acetates to the water and create a secondary buffer system in the water that would not be desirable. Dry acid (sodium bisulfate) forms sulfuric acid when dissolved in water and that is chemically a 'strong acid' . If you don't like using it there is always muriatic acid which is, IMHO, a better choice.
Save the vinegar for making pickles!



#4 waterbear

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Posted 31 July 2007 - 03:34 PM

IF you are fighting algae the algae will consume the chlorine quickly. To kill the algae you need to add chlorine several times a day to maintain the free chlorine level. When your free chlorine is holding overnight you are done.
I've tested more water than I ever care to think about!
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#5 ClearWater

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Posted 31 July 2007 - 10:27 PM

Thanks, Waterbear. Will do.

Tracy
QUOTE(waterbear @ Jul 31 2007, 04:34 PM) View Post
IF you are fighting algae the algae will consume the chlorine quickly. To kill the algae you need to add chlorine several times a day to maintain the free chlorine level. When your free chlorine is holding overnight you are done.






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