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Spa Install Options For Placement On A Slope


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#1 joeboo

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Posted 30 November 2008 - 06:47 PM

I'm trying to figure out how to build a base for a spa on my sloped lot.

The location I want to put the spa has somewhere between 7" and 10" of slope from the highest point to the lowest point. I can't just dig down the highest point to be level with the lowest point, because then my spa is too low. The highest point backs up to an existing patio that's 36" off the ground, and I'd like the top of the spa to be flush with the patio.

I've considered pouring a concrete slab, but I'm wondering if anyone has any alternatives to concrete. The idea of "building a box with wood and filling with pea gravel" I don't think would work too well because of the sloped ground, as I'd need a 10" high box, at least one one side.

I'm open to using concrete pavers, pea gravel, or one of these "spa pads", but can't really come up with ways to make any of these stable.

#2 KIALDA

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Posted 30 November 2008 - 07:21 PM

sorry, I posted my answer and photo on the other thread you started. I was addressing the slope issue..

#3 joeboo

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Posted 30 November 2008 - 08:08 PM

QUOTE(KIALDA @ Nov 30 2008, 09:21 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
sorry, I posted my answer and photo on the other thread you started. I was addressing the slope issue..


So what keeps that brick wall from toppling over? My hot tub would be above the retaining wall, and I'm worried about the force from the weight of the hot tub and the weight of the fill toppling the wall.

#4 KIALDA

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Posted 30 November 2008 - 08:22 PM

That was the whole reason I posted that photo, You are only going up 10" look how high up some of those walls are and the tons of material they hold back. No worries mate, there are stones made for these walls, they work well.10" is not a big deal..

#5 joeboo

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Posted 30 November 2008 - 08:30 PM

Yeah, I see your wall is maybe 10', not 10".

Is that just the interlocking bricks, and that's it? I've seen the interlocking bricks used for flowerbeds and other low-load walls, but didn't realize they could support much weight.

#6 KIALDA

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Posted 30 November 2008 - 08:37 PM

Go to your local lanscaping supply place. I am sure they can show you all the options that you have. Yes the interlocking Blocks can hold back well when installed correctly and have good drainage. Like I said, 10" is really not a big deal and will take you very little time to install.

#7 joeboo

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Posted 30 November 2008 - 08:50 PM

Thanks, I'll stop by Lowe's and see what they have.

#8 RickJ

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Posted 01 December 2008 - 10:23 AM

Check with a professional landscaping store for the blocks that they have.

http://www.keystonewalls.com/

Many of these blocks have holes in them where you can pound in some stakes to hold the blocks from moving. Once installed, these things are very stable.


As for your other question about a concrete slab, it is okay to pour a simple slab without footings. This is called a floating slab. Floating slabs are often used for patios and driveways. So it's not a problem for your hot tub. If you are concerned about it sliding down the slope, you could probably dig a couple of holes within the slab to give is some anchor points. Or you can make the edges thicker than the rest of the slab (6-8" thick, instead of 4" for the rest of the slab). But consult a concrete guy about the anchoring idea. I have no idea if the anchor holes would work, or if they would cause problems. For my patio, it was a simple pour.

Good luck.
Lack of knowledge has never prevented me from commenting on anything.

#9 realDrew

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Posted 01 December 2008 - 01:33 PM

You could also pour some posts with sauna tubes and have rebar come out of the top and tie into the slab. Kind of a semi-floating slab.

QUOTE(RickJ @ Dec 1 2008, 01:23 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Check with a professional landscaping store for the blocks that they have.

http://www.keystonewalls.com/

Many of these blocks have holes in them where you can pound in some stakes to hold the blocks from moving. Once installed, these things are very stable.


As for your other question about a concrete slab, it is okay to pour a simple slab without footings. This is called a floating slab. Floating slabs are often used for patios and driveways. So it's not a problem for your hot tub. If you are concerned about it sliding down the slope, you could probably dig a couple of holes within the slab to give is some anchor points. Or you can make the edges thicker than the rest of the slab (6-8" thick, instead of 4" for the rest of the slab). But consult a concrete guy about the anchoring idea. I have no idea if the anchor holes would work, or if they would cause problems. For my patio, it was a simple pour.

Good luck.


I may be all wet, but I'm HOT !!!

#10 david1pro

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Posted 01 December 2008 - 03:48 PM

Here's how I dug into the hill next to my deck. Fairly new, but we've had a lot of rain in the past month and there's not been any problem: http://photolinguist...lleries/spa.php

#11 joeboo

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Posted 01 December 2008 - 09:37 PM

Thanks for all the options.

David, thanks for the pictures. Your project looks nice. Though I wish I had your problem instead of mine (having to dig down instead of building up).




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