• Announcements

    • webmaster

      Server Move   09/20/2016

      Hello! We are now in the progress of updating the server where PoolSpaForum.com resides. During this move, there will be a loss of some recently made posts. Thank you for your patience and understanding as we create a better technical environment for your favorite Pool and Spa forum.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
sealginCO

How To Override 104 Limit

11 posts in this topic

I have read a lot of the dialog on this topic. I too want to increase my spa temp by a few degrees sometimes.

I also am aware of all the nanny's who want to lecture us about how the federal temperature police will get us. That is my secondary motivator - to do it just because the nanny's dont like it.

Anyway... the resistors in sensor circuit approach seemed like a rats nest to me. Defeating my Balboa controllers seemed pretty impossible. So here is my brute-force but quite simple method. Works great!

Buy:

--15 minute wall timer (like from homedepot)

--240v/12vac relay

Now:

--Run line voltage from the controller's line-in posts to the relay

--Run line voltage from the relay to the spa heater terminals.

--Supply the relay with 12vac from the Controller's transformer.

--Switch the relay with the 15min timer.

Operation:

--When I set the timer, the heater will turn on regardless of temperature. I do this about 10 or 15 min before I get in the spa. The spa heats at about 5 degress per hour so its easy to set the timer for two or three degrees of increase over the starting temperature. This takes the temp from 104 to about 106 - which is what I want.

-- My spa has an always-on circ pump so starting the heater is not a problem. If your spa runs on a filter cycle then you will have to ensure that the pump is running before you turn on the heater - else it will instantly burn up. You may think of your own creative way to ensure the pump is running.

-- no resistors. no controller changes. no bogus temperature displays. Hooking this up is easy if you are smarter than a 5th grader and not a nanny.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some controllers allow you to do it by pressing a couple of buttons. 106 is veeerrry niiice. (Borat voice)

Not after 2006, before it was no problem

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Doesnt your system shut down since it should sense an overheat. Circ pumps shut off when 2 degrees over the set temp, entire spa shuts off when it reaches 107-108, You would have to be careful since overriding these protections could toast the control system and or other components

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Doesnt your system shut down since it should sense an overheat. Circ pumps shut off when 2 degrees over the set temp, entire spa shuts off when it reaches 107-108, You would have to be careful since overriding these protections could toast the control system and or other components

many spas straight from the factory can override to 106 but 108 is nuts...waay to hot for my liking

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

FYI. All of this has nothing to do with nanny's or the federal temperature police. It IS all about liability and the litigious populating of this country.

On Dec 31, 1979, the Consumer Products Safety Commission (CSPC) released advisory #79-071, which warned of heat strokes caused by 106 °F water. This advisory recommended 104°F as the maximum temperature for a spa. Underwriters Laboratory (UL) adopted this advisory and lists it in their controlling document for home spas, #UL 1563 (Electric Spas, Equipment Assemblies, and Associated Equipment.

With all of that, if someone, ANYONE, were to get injured in a spa, and could successfully argue that the injury was caused by the temperature of the water being OVER 104 degrees and that the spa manufacturer* designed the spa to operate this way, just about any court in this land would rule against the spa manufacturer. "You knew there was a possibility of water hotter than 104 to cause injuries, therefore you're liable".

This could EASILY be a 6 figure, if not 7 figure judgment. Of course, everyone has insurance, and that would pay the judgment...maybe. Now the insurance companies are saying, if you want us to insure you, your spa can't go above 104.

If you want to blame someone, look to the people that refuse to take responsibility for their own actions and will sue anyone for anything at any time...just to make a buck (I won't even begin to start in on attorneys, that perpetuate this type of thing).

*It's very easy to alter a spa to increase it's maximum temperature. But, if I tell you how to accomplish a higher than 104 temperature, I then also have the same liability. Don't even start in with, "I wont hold you responsible", or, "I'll sign a release". Over and over, these things have been shown to not be worth the parer they're written on in court.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You can still overide the 104 max temp on some hot tubs built after 2006, mine is a 2010 model and I have it set for 106 degrees, was easy to do, kinda just stumbled on it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My 2005 Caldera has two OT (Over Temperature) settings above 104 F. So I can just got to OT2 and I have 106F. but that is too hot for me. I keep it set at 103F.

Dave

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

With Hot Spring, there is evidently some trick to override the 104 setpoint on the new models, because this is what a local dealer told me. But only if you buy the new spa do you get the info. Since I have a 2006, it's not an issue because these models have higher setpoints that are "coded" ut1, ut2, ut3, and ut4. How these codes would shield them from liability issues, that is a dang good question.

Anyways, my spa appears to have a 2-4 degree variation between setpoint and actual. Then again, I don't have a whole lot of faith in the accuracy of the floating thermometer that came with the tub. But if the tub temperature is out of whack, then it is likely Hot Spring has a way to adjust or compensate for the difference. My guess is that therein lies the "trick" to temperature modifications.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0