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PCBeach

Pros And Cons Of Using A Chlorine Generator?

7 posts in this topic

Anyone out there with any experience using a Salt Chlorine generator on their spa? Like the pool set-up and soft water, but will this work on a spa also? I understand the effects of SW on dissimilar metals, corrosive and galvanic effects that may affect heaters, pumps, and PVC piping used in spas. Read a lot of manufacturer's claims, but what I am looking for is actually use from the informed consumer. Other than initial cost and possible lifecycle costs, Will this system work...and what should I expect? Have scoured the spa forum, searched and not found a lot of feedback on the subject. Did I miss something?

Thanks for any opinions and input!

:D

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If you look through threads about Ozen, there is a lot about this system. Arctic has it for an option on their spas and people have been buzzing about it.

The other option is the Gensis system(search for Pioneer H2O) that produces bromine instead of chlorine starting with salts. There are a few tub companies that have this too. Our line sells it as an option and we just started selling it to people. We did not for a few years because there were many issues with it failing. The industry has also been addressing the salt corrsion issue, and it is not as much of an issue with spas from what I understand. You would have to research that through individual companies that make the units.

There is a knack to either system getting them to produce the chlorine/bromine that you need for your individual use but once you get it they are not bad. Many of my customers that purchase them have second homes and they like that it is producing sanitizer even if they are gone a month. Since they are not using the tub the PH stays pretty well. They say you do not have to change the water for upwards of a year, depending on use, because the TDS does not increase because you are not adding chemicals all the time. The cost for chemicals is signifigantly reduced and over time pays for the addtional cost of the unit, along with less frequent water changes. The cons are the exspence at fresh fill, so if you have a mishap shortly into a fill, a water change can be costly.

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Here is a thread about the Spa Pilot which is a SWCG for spas. Other than that thread there hasn't been much talk about it.

Thanks for the information! Great thread with SWCG. I am looking at putting a similar system on a Sundance Capri...we have moved and no longer have access to my HS Grandee (1996 model) that I placed a EcoSpa (Australian model) SWG on in the circulation loop. Worked well, had flow control to ensure water was circulation before activating electrodes, salt indicator to tell whether enough in to generate chlorine, indicators for high, low and activation, self cleaning. So in essence, it worked very well once you understand what it was doing and how to balance the water. I did experience some corrosion at the water heater (welded bolts are low grade stainless), but after replacing one heater coil and sealing unit tightly, no ill effects. After a decade of use, I figured I was due. The thought of using zinc to counteract the galvanic effects crossed my mind, but have not seen a need for them. The upfront cost is high, but the satisfaction from using, not adding chemicals (my wife does not monitor), soft water and fact that I can walk away for a few days without monitoring are enough for me to do again...

Again, thanks for the information! :D

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If you have a small amount of Cyanuric Acid (CYA) in the water, say 20-30 ppm, then that will reduce corrosion significantly. Without CYA in the water, the chlorine is too strong unless you are able to maintain a very low Free Chlorine (FC) level of around 0.2 ppm with no CYA and that's usually not practical and can run out locally too quickly. With 20-30 ppm CYA, you can maintain 3-4 ppm FC.

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If you have a small amount of Cyanuric Acid (CYA) in the water, say 20-30 ppm, then that will reduce corrosion significantly. Without CYA in the water, the chlorine is too strong unless you are able to maintain a very low Free Chlorine (FC) level of around 0.2 ppm with no CYA and that's usually not practical and can run out locally too quickly. With 20-30 ppm CYA, you can maintain 3-4 ppm FC.

Thanks for the information, had not thought of using the CYA to counteract any corrossive effects. Will try it out...

Tks

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