poolyeti

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About poolyeti

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  • Birthday 01/24/1983

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    Sharpsville, PA
  1. is that the plastic tubes at the bottom? wouldn't i need to empty the sand first? i know the filter is working, when i backwash its plenty dirty, i'd just like it to work better. Yes, those are the tubes in the bottom. The only other reason that would happen would be if the filter valve was in the wrong position when you put in the DE. If you don't want to mess with taking all the sand out of your filter, and you feel pretty confident that it's working, then you could try a flocculant.
  2. Sorry, duplicate post
  3. I'm going to respectfully disagree with Strannik. Stabilizer is not a required component for a sanitizing system. It's true that you may end up using a little more sanitizer, but for my money, it's better to not have to deal with the problems that stabilizer can cause. We have a customer who uses unstabilized bromine in his pool, and it always looks pretty good. It is a bit more expensive than chlorine though.
  4. If your yard/roof gets a lot of sun, then a solar heater might not be a bad option for you. If you're interested, message me and I can help you find one. They're not very expensive as compared to propane or gas heaters, and although they don't give anywhere near the amount of heat, they are definitely cheaper to operate
  5. There are many different opinions around here regarding CYA, and at the risk of starting a fire, I'll just put mine out there. I recommend to my customers to not use CYA at all. Put in one quart of chlorine per 10,000 gallons at night, so that it kills everything that was put in during the day, and then you get to swim in clean plain water during the day. But that's just my 2 cents.
  6. There are many different opinions around here regarding CYA, and at the risk of starting a fire, I'll just put mine out there. I recommend to my customers to not use CYA at all. Put in one quart of chlorine per 10,000 gallons at night, so that it kills everything that was put in during the day, and then you get to swim in clean plain water during the day. But that's just my 2 cents.
  7. I'd need an assist from Richard, but I would probably say both. Regarding the CC, with you CYA as high as it is, it's possible that you would need so much FC to keep the CC down that it could end up bleaching out the reagents. As far as usage is concerned, I'm having to guess on your gallonage, but I estimate that you shouldn't be using more than a gallon and a half of chlorine per week. We typically suggest that customers add 1 quart of 12.5-15% chlorine per 10,000 gal every night. I'm estimating that your pool has something like 6500 gallons, which would make just a tad over a pint a night.
  8. Hey, Pretty much the only difference between the 2005 and 2006 is the method used for testing chlorine. the 2005 is DPD (color-based) and the 2006 is FAS-DPD (titrating or drop based). The 2006 is more accurate and less subjective.
  9. hi Phil. what is this "purple stuff" you're adding? also, how often are you adding these things?How often do you test your water?
  10. Hi wizard, With a CYA over 100 and CH around 500, I would really just lose some more water. Even if you could get everything balanced back out, your chlorine demand would be freakish.
  11. srw, where do you live? The climate in your area is going to factor pretty heavily into what kind(s) of heating options you want to consider. I noticed that you only listed solar-based heating options. Are you considering any other types?
  12. I would take another sample of the water back to the place and have them test it again to make sure that something is wrong. It's worth the trip at least to make sure that you have to drain it.
  13. Where in PA are you David? I know a few pool professionals in the area.
  14. The brown goo is completely normal and means you baqua product is working exactly like it should. everything with baqua in front of it means that it acts primarily as a coagulant, encapsulating impurities in a gooey substance so that the filter can catch them better. This leads to tons of garbage trapped in sticky stuff caught in your filter. With prolonged use, baqua products also have a tendency to cause all kinds of problems with your water. Also, it's expensive. I'll let you draw your own conclusions from here :-)
  15. Honestly, I wouldn't recommend either of those filters. The whole regenerative cycle DE filter idea jsut doesn't do it for me. The idea that I would let the DE inside my filter get clogged up with dirt, and then shake it around so that my water is now being filtered through semi-dirty DE, and then that I'm gong to do that a couple more times before I actually change the DE is a little bit gross. I would recommend a non-regenerative DE filter or a sand filter.